Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

http://jdrf.org/press-releases/jdrf-funded-islet-encapsulation-program-reaches-historic-milestone/?utm_source=ViacyteImplantOct2014&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=InsiderNews&s_src=email&s_subsrc=InsiderNews_ViacyteImplantOct2014

Share

Show your support for organ donation at the University of Michigan’s Vita Redita, a black tie celebration of Life Restored!

Vita Redita 2014 . . .

   November 8, 2014 at 6pm

      Silent & Live Auction, fabulous food

         at the Jack Roth Suites . . .

             in the Big House . . .

                 SAVING LIVES!

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO GET TICKETS VISIT: http://www.umtransplantevents.org/events/vita-redita

Share

While on dialysis, I wondered whether we would see this day.  But now, after kidney and pancreas transplants, my years have been significantly extended!

Friday, May 23, 2014 Steve and I celebrated our 25th Wedding Anniversary at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. We had a fabulous time with friends, members of our wedding party and of course family. We entered the routunda after guests viewed the video below, as the dj played Pharrell Williams’ “Happy”!  Please enjoy our video:

 

Share

Share

 

There are so many observances throughout the year that several of them happen simultaneously. However April’s pairing of National Minority Health Month and National Donate Life Month is not pure happenstance.

National Minority Health Month

African Americans and other ethnic minorities are plagued by a number of chronic illnesses that may not be an immediate threat to life itself; however neglect of these chronic and often preventable conditions can surely lead to an early death. Perhaps the biggest of these chronic illnesses that disproportionately plague African Americans is hypertension and diabetes. According to the National Institute of Health,

“The most common causes of kidney failure are diabetes and high blood pressure, together accounting for about 70 percent of new cases.”

That bears repeating, 70 percent of new cases of chronic kidney disease is caused by uncontrolled diabetes and hypertension—both controllable conditions. Controllable in large part by good decision making: diet and exercise, and medication prescribed by a doctor. And this brings us to the next April observance.

National Donate Life Month

National Donate Life Month promoted largely by the Gift of Life Foundation encourages people to make the decision to become organ donors, either living or at the time of death so that those waiting on the transplant list, can live. There are currently more than 110,000 people waiting for an organ transplant in the U.S. Millions of organs are wasted daily when people die without donating their organs. It is a simple process to sign up on the national organ donor registry: http://donatelife.net/register-now/

In the case of kidneys, while African Americans make up 12% of the population, we make up 32% of those on dialysis.

In April and beyond, join with me to make smart and healthy decisions to improve minority health, and please “Donate Life”—my brother Jeff (my kidney donor) and another individual (my pancreas donor)’s decisions to donate life are why I live today!

Share

Because diabetes is a disease affecting many parts of the body, successful management requires a team approach. Today’s podiatrist is an integral part of the treatment team and has documented success in preventing amputations:

  • More than 65,000 lower limbs are amputated annually due to complications from diabetes.

  • After an amputation, the chance of another amputation within three to five years is as high as 50 percent.

  • Including a podiatrist in your diabetes care can reduce the risk of lower limb amputation up to 85 percent and lowers the risk of hospitalization by 24 percent.

The keys to amputation prevention are early recognition and regular foot screenings performed by a podiatrist, the foot and ankle expert.

Take Action

If you have diabetes, follow these foot care tips:

  • Inspect feet daily. Check your feet and toes every day for cuts, bruises, sores, or changes to the toenails, such as thickening or discoloration.

  • Wear thick, soft socks. Avoid socks with seams, which could rub and cause blisters or other skin injuries.

  • Exercise. Walking can keep weight down and improve circulation. Be sure to wear appropriate athletic shoes when exercising.

  • Have new shoes properly measured and fitted. Foot size and shape may change over time. Shoes that fit properly are important to those with diabetes.

  • Don’t go barefoot. Don’t go without shoes, even in your own home. The risk of cuts and infection is too great for those with diabetes.

  • Never try to remove calluses, corns, or warts by yourself. Over-the-counter products can burn the skin and cause irreparable damage to the foot for people with diabetes.

  • See today’s podiatrist. Regular checkups by a podiatrist—at least annually—are the best way to ensure that your feet remain healthy.

 FROM THE AMERICAN PODIATRIC MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

Share

 

Christmastime is when most of us decorate our homes and invite family and friends over to overeat, laugh and catch up on what has been going on since the last time the group was together.  If you have lost a loved one it is also a time when we remember Christmases past and the fun times we shared.

When I lost my father he was just 52 years old and there was a list of people that I felt God could have taken instead of my father.  Each holiday felt like my shopping list was so short–even though there was only one name removed.  My father-in-law perhaps suffered the most. His birthday was the same day as my father’s. We’d have a birthday dinner for both of them and I would buy similar gifts in different colors–it was fun. But after my father died, I couldn’t bring myself to shop for September 23.

Finally I rationalized in my mind that I shouldn’t feel sorry for myself about having lost my father.  There were many women that I knew who would never know what it was like to have a father like mine.  The old saying that it is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all, is hard to grasp–AND SOMETHING YOU NEVER WANT TO HEAR RIGHT AFTER LOSING SOMEONE.  But in time, I got it.   The impact of my father’s love for me has lasted me and I believe will continue to last for the rest of my life. People (particularly my son) are probably so tired of hearing me say, “What my father used to say about that is . . .”

It’s a good thing that I learned that lesson before losing my mother.  By this time I had received the Gift of Life twice and survived the West Nile virus.  And so what brought me peace was that “things” were not my mother nor did they represent her. But the impact that she had on my life and the lives of so many others, is her legacy.

My brother and I were also fortunate in that  we were able to carry out her final wishes and that was to donate her organs to people who needed them. It is interesting that we did not discuss her wishes during or after our kidney transplant.  But we both knew growing up that both our parents wanted to donate their organs–it was something that they discussed with us as children.

We missed the opportunity when our father died, however we were able to oblige our mother.  Even though it wasn’t my organs that were donated, that we completed my mother’s wishes, felt like I was paying it forward.  One day I will ACTUALLY pay it forward since I am a registered organ donor.

Even though they are not likely to use my brother’s transplanted kidney in my body or my new pancreas, I don’t want to make a medical decision that I’m not qualified to make.  The way I figure it, let me donate the organs when I’m through with them and let the doctors decide who may be able to use them.

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED AN ORGAN TRANSPLANT, REGISTER TO BECOME AN ORGAN DONOR AND PAY IT FORWARD!

 

Share

Halloween is a holiday that is celebrated with activities often forbidden for people with diabetes. So what do children do for this holiday? For that matter, any holiday or day filled with seasonal treats?

When I was a child growing up with diabetes in the 70s, my doctor allowed me to choose 3 “Hog Wild” days per year. The concept was that I would follow my diet 362 days out of the year, but be allowed to eat whatever I wanted on those 3 days. While psychologically that may have made me feel better about measured mash potatoes served from an ice cream scoop without butter, fact is I wasn’t always true to the diet for the full 362 days. And even on those Hog Wild days, my mother had to watch me extremely closely–since at that time there was no glucometer to know exactly how high my blood sugar was. It really was kind of a dangerous concept.

Today, with glucometers and short acting insulins or insulin pumps, it is a much easier and less dangerous way to enjoy a once forbidden holiday. While I don’t believe (and I don’t think medical professionals would either) the best course of action would be to overdo it on all the candy you collect, I do think an after dinner treat monitored with a glucometer, or Continuous Glucose Monitor and treated with short acting insulin or insulin pump as prescribed by your physician, wouldn’t hurt.

Normalcy is what gets us through the sometimes difficult times of managing chronic illness. And the more we can feel like everybody else, the more we don’t mind working a little harder to make that happen safely.

Share

Once again, we are excited to present our ‘FREE’ Annual “Taking Diabetes to School 2013” Conference & Exhibits …everything you need to know about creating and maintaining a safe learning environment for students with diabetes.  A strong support network at school is needed to help them manage their diabetes, stay safe and continue learning – JDRF is here to help!

New this year: Hands-on Demo Stations and interactive networking with diabetes educators, clinicians, and parents!

If you have questions or you would like to reserve your spot at this important and informative event, please contact Denise Pentescu at JDRF.

Phone: 517.899.2251

Fax: 248.355.1188

Email dpentescu@jdrf.org

JDRF Registration Form

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share

Actor Anthony Anderson, Spokesperson for the Eli Lilly’s F.A.C.E. program.

African Americans are diagnosed with diabetes more than 2.5 times the rate of whites. I had the opportunity to interview Anthony Anderson about his ambassador role as national spokesperson for Eli Lilly’s F.A.C.E. program. The Fearless African Americans Connected and Empowered (F.A.C.E.) program is designed specifically to reach African Americans and inform us about how to prevent or manage the epidemic diabetes diagnoses in our community.
Listen to our hilarious interview:

This is part one, stay tuned for part 2.

Share