Soul Food has been the blame for Type 2 diabetes and uncontrolled Type 1 diabetes for years.  One of the reasons that it has not been quickly eliminated from the diet of African Americans is because of the social role these foods have played throughout history.  Much like the movie “Soul Food”, the Sunday Diner and family contribution to its preparation is what has historically kept families together.  Therefore for the sake of the African American family, we must find a way to uphold this ritual and at the same time reverse the effects it has on diabetes and heart disease.

Many of the foods are in fact healthy and nutrient filled at the start.  It is often the preparation styles that rid the foods of their cancer fighting and sometimes blood pressure lowering nutrients.  Adding excess salt and fat also cause some dishes to be unhealthy. With a few slight changes, soul food can become not just good to you, but good for you.

Low-Sodium Selections

Traditional soul food is high in sodium or salt. Replace
table salt with sea salt. This type of salt has a strong flavor, and you won’t
need to use too much of it to get the flavor you desire. Select foods that say
“reduced” or “low-sodium” on the labels. Include dried or fresh herbs and spices
in your favorite soul food recipes to add flavor without adding
salt.

 

Low-Fat Diet Options

Traditional soul foods can be high in unhealthy fat,
such as saturated and trans fat. Soulfoodandsoutherncooking.com suggests
replacing traditional soul food ham hock with smoked turkey and using turkey
bacon instead of pork bacon. Breading and frying meat and poultry are typical
soul food preparations. Select a lean cut of beef or skinless chicken breast,
which are low in saturated fat. Coat the protein with flour, egg wash and
crushed-up corn-flake cereal. You can add your favorite seasonings such as sea
salt or dried herbs. Spray a cookie sheet with a nonstick spray and bake the
meat until done. This cooking method cuts out the fat from battering and
frying.

Balanced Carbohydrate and Veggie Options

Soul foods include starchy vegetables such as corn,
potatoes and peas. You can still enjoy these foods while having diabetes, but
you need to balance them with some nonstarchy vegetables. Enjoy steamed green
leafy vegetables alongside your starchy veggies. Prepare collard greens, spinach
or kale in a hot saute pan with a splash of red wine vinegar. Drizzle the cooked
greens with heart-healthy olive oil, and sprinkle with sea salt to finish.
Black-eyed peas are a staple of soul food. Pair these simple carbohydrates with
complex carbohydrates such as brown or wild rice. Simple carbs break down
quickly and may cause a spike in your blood sugar. Pairing them with complex
carbs may help to stabilize your blood sugar since foods with complex carbs take
longer to break down.

Replacements in Baked Goods

When baking biscuits or cornbread, replace fatty
buttermilk with a reduced-fat milk. Whipped cream is a delicious addition to
homemade apple pie. Replace half the heavy whipping cream with reduced-fat milk
to shave some fat. Use 1 percent or skim milk in recipes that traditionally call
for whole milk.

Different Fats and Oils

Fill your diet with heart-healthy fats, such as
monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and omega fatty acids. Use healthy oils such as
olive, vegetable and corn oil in your cooking. Replace butter with margarine.
Include some nuts that are high in monounsaturated fats, such as almonds,
cashews and walnuts.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/328360-soul-food-diet-for-diabetics/#ixzz1lf3mTmIx

 

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