Chronic diseases or conditions like diabetes, multiple sclerosis, hypoglycemia, asthma, kidney disease, hypertension, heart disease and transplant living all require a regimen that requires strict adherence. Not following these regimens or staying within the guidelines can cause serious problems, long term complications or even sudden death. Almost all of these conditions require a special diet or dietary restrictions.  Some of them can be controlled with diet alone. Others also require medicines and test procedures.

This can seem overwhelming for someone first diagnosed with a chronic illness, and it can continue if the patient doesn’t develop a regimen to accommodate the medicine schedule, the dietary restrictions and timing, and exercise requirements. The restrictions that a chronic condition requires can feel overwhelmingly restrictive, but consider the alternative. If a diabetic doesn’t develop a regimen to consistently take medication, follow a low glycemic diet with the prescribed carbohydrate restrictions and exercise as suggested, then blood sugars can dip too low and cause a severe hypoglycemic reaction resulting in loss of consciousness or even death. Other chronic conditions can result in similar serious conditions as well as sudden death.  This is why a regimen to prevent these severe reactions is important.

How do you manage diabetes? How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time!

In other words, you break down what needs to happen and put it up against your usual daily schedule.

  1. 1. List the things that must be done for proper management of your condition. In the case of diabetes, you would list your dietary requirements and restrictions, your medicine doses and times, your test and exercise requirements/suggestions.

  2. 2. List your normal daily activities and job travel and/or timing requirements. For instance if you work 8am until 5pm, and you travel 10%  of the time, typically Tuesday through Friday.

  3. 3. Now blend the lists by figuring out what the breakfast requirements translate into as far as a meal; what you will eat for lunch (whether purchased at a restaurant or packed in a  brown bag lunch) and how you will complete dinner requirements. When you will test and if you will gets some midday exercise walking outside or to lunch.

  4. 4. You should also write down when you will test during these hours and at home.

  5. 5. Finally look over the list of requirements and make sure that you determine what supplies you need to make this regimen work. For instance, if carrying blood testing supplies and the machine is not convenient, then you might want to consider keeping an  extra set at work in a locker or in your desk. If that means keeping medicine at work as well, make sure to consider the storage requirements of the medication. For instance, insulin doesn’t need to be refrigerated; however it shouldn’t be kept in direct sunlight either.

  6. 6. Schedule time for exercise so that it is not an afterthought that is not done regularly.

The key is to make sure that what your condition requires, you make available and convenient so that it is easy to be compliant to your doctor’s orders.

Share