Camp Michitanki 2012

 

During my seven months of peritoneal dialysis, my very complicated regimen of being connected to a machine all night, waking up to a routine of blood sugar testing, taking insulin, weighing myself and recording it in my log book, became overwhelming quickly. I look back on it now and recall how tedious and time consuming it was to manage my availability of dialysis fluid, calculate my requirements with a system of month-end dialysis fluid inventory, ordering a shipment with enough boxes of each fluid strength and accepting the monthly shipments of fluid from a truck driver who wheeled in  +/-20 boxes of fluid from his 18-wheel semi truck. I can only imagine what my neighbors thought when a big semi truck entered our cul-de-sac at 7 in the morning to make 3-4 trips with a dolly full of boxes, to bring them into my house.

I longed to have my normal life back. And then, normal meant life with diabetes, but not dialysis. My kidney transplant made me feel free and completely rejuvenated. My later pancreas transplant made me feel something I don’t ever remember feeling–life without insulin, testing and dietary restrictions.

If I had this kind of euphoria from my transplants as an adult, imagine how a child feels after being transplanted. All kids ever want is to be is like their friends. They want to dress like their friends, wear their hair like them, talk like them, eat what they eat, go where they go . . . And so it is not surprising that kids living with organ transplants need that sense of normalcy even more than other kids. And that is why the University of Michigan Transplant Center has created Camp Michitanki, a place where kids living with organ transplants can do camp activities like all of their friends, in the safe environment and under the watchful eye of transplant doctors and nurses.

You can support Camp Michitanki and enjoy a fabulous experience at the BIG HOUSE–Michigan Stadium Jack Roth suites, by attending the University of Michigan Transplant Center’s Vita Redita black tie gala and charity auction. The event is called the Vita Redita because it is Latin for Life Restored!

If you would like to attend the event, become a sponsor, or donate by providing an auction item, please contact the Events Director, Melissa Swain at (734) 232-0594. In the meantime, read more about Camp Michitanki in the Detroit Free Press http://www.freep.com/article/20120705/NEWS05/207050461/Transplant-camp-lets-kids-be-kids?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|FRONTPAGE

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