When first diagnosed with diabetes it is likely that you have to develop a new routine and change some bad habits. While many young people with Type 1 diabetes haven’t established a routine and so the prescribed routine from their doctor easily becomes their routine, often people newly diagnosed with Type 2, Gestational or Pre diabetes have a more difficult time making change to their established routines and habits.

Much like fad dieting, biting the bullet and deciding to try to eat the right food and  test like a robot three times a day, doesn’t create a routine and you are likely to slip back into old habits. On the other hand, understanding the reasons for eating certain foods and testing glucose levels with a purpose in mind will bring about permanent change.

According to author of Changing for Good, James Prochaska, PhD, there are six stages of change that a person has to go through in order to make permanent change and they are

  1. PRE CONTEMPLATION- recognizing that a change or routine is necessary.

  2. CONTEMPLATION – thinking about what that new routine might look like.

  3. PREPARATION – organizing thoughts and supplies necessary to begin the new routine.

  4. ACTION – Beginning to eat, test and exercise according to the new routine.

  5. MAINTENANCE – the action steps are now a daily routine with seamless modifications for schedule changes,

  6. TERMINATION – for some types of change like smoking cessation, the maintenance phase may no longer be necessary, however for Diabetes Control, the maintenance routine never ends and provides a very healthy lifestyle whether a person has diabetes or not.

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