Halloween is a holiday that is celebrated with activities often forbidden for people with diabetes. So what do children do for this holiday? For that matter, any holiday or day filled with seasonal treats?

When I was a child growing up with diabetes in the 70s, my doctor allowed me to choose 3 “Hog Wild” days per year. The concept was that I would follow my diet 362 days out of the year, but be allowed to eat whatever I wanted on those 3 days. While psychologically that may have made me feel better about measured mash potatoes served from an ice cream scoop without butter, fact is I wasn’t always true to the diet for the full 362 days. And even on those Hog Wild days, my mother had to watch me extremely closely–since at that time there was no glucometer to know exactly how high my blood sugar was. It really was kind of a dangerous concept.

Today, with glucometers and short acting insulins or insulin pumps, it is a much easier and less dangerous way to enjoy a once forbidden holiday. While I don’t believe (and I don’t think medical professionals would either) the best course of action would be to overdo it on all the candy you collect, I do think an after dinner treat monitored with a glucometer, or Continuous Glucose Monitor and treated with short acting insulin or insulin pump as prescribed by your physician, wouldn’t hurt.

Normalcy is what gets us through the sometimes difficult times of managing chronic illness. And the more we can feel like everybody else, the more we don’t mind working a little harder to make that happen safely.

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