Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

Browsing Posts in Organ Transplant

Join walkers from all over the state of Michigan to support the National Kidney Foundation in its quest to advocate for patients in all stages of chronic kidney disease.

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The Affordable Care Act, signed and passed in March of last year, holds many benefits for those both pre- and post-transplant. While you may already be familiar with some of the Act’s immediate benefits, it’s in your interest to understand how long-term initiatives may improve your healthcare coverage in the future.

General benefits to look for

If you have been denied insurance due to a pre-existing condition—such as a history of transplant or kidney disease—the Act is creating ways to help1,2:

It removes lifetime coverage limits and sets more reasonable annual limits

As of September 2010, it eliminated pre-existing conditions as a reason for denying coverage to, or setting high premiums on, individuals up to 19 years of age

Effective 2014, it will eliminate pre-existing conditions as a reason for denying coverage to, or setting high premiums on, individuals 19 years and older

Your options until 20143

Most significantly, the Act has created the Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP)—which may provide you affordable, non–income-based coverage if you’ve been uninsured or denied insurance for at least 6 months due to a pre-existing condition.4

Standard PCIP benefits include primary, specialty, and preventative care; hospitalization services; and prescription drug coverage.4 Depending on where you live, these benefits may either be managed by the federal government or the state.4 Click the map for benefits, coverage rates, and enrollment details specific to your state of residence5:

If your PCIP program is run by the state, you will be offered a single plan by that state; but if it is run by the federal government, you will have the option of selecting from the following 3 plans6-8:

Be sure to read the 2011 PCIP Brochure and the PCIP Benefits Summary before discussing your options with a financial coordinator or PCIP representative.

Your access to coverage is critical to your transplant health. With the help of the Affordable Care Act, you are now many steps closer to ensuring a successful journey ahead.

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The book ”Blessed Assurance” gives the reader  a sense of admiration and appreciation  for the fortitude and resilience  that Jacquie had going through bouts of illnesses and having hope and faith and believing that through God she would be victorious.

I used her book and its teachings to console a close friend of mine who was depressed because of her own illness. “Blessed Assurance” is a tool for people to learn to have hope in the face of  so many uncertainties. There were many times she prayed for strength and courage to face the many challenges encountered. It
is apparent that God used Jacquie for a purpose to witness and testify to what God can do.

It is through the belief that Christ died so we  may have life, that surely was the basis that kept Jacquie fighting the bouts of  diabetes, and it was though the love displayed by her family that  helped her propel her illness into a platform for success.

 

Barbara Talley

A Friend in Christ

Hope United Methodist Church

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Listen as January Jones interviews Jacquie Lewis-Kemp about living with diabetes.

Listen to internet radio with Ms January Jones on Blog Talk Radio

 

 

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5/17/2011

The National Kidney Foundation is launching a multi-site cross-sectional study, Awareness, Detection and Drug Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Kidney Disease (ADD-CKD). The study will assess how chronic kidney disease is being identified and managed in type II diabetic patients, in the primary care setting.

Recent research has shown that primary care physicians are extremely busy and have little time to spend discussing risk factors and preventative steps with patients at risk for kidney disease. One study found that only half of primary care doctors discussed chronic kidney disease, with their diabetic patients. And when it was discussed, half of doctors spoke about CKD for 33 seconds or less – an average of only 3% of the total visit time.
 
“Primary care physicians are our first line of defense against one of the world’s top killers,” said Lynda Szczech, MD, MSCE, President of the National Kidney Foundation. “More than 26 million Americans already have chronic kidney disease, and millions more are at risk and don’t even know it.  Early detection and treatment of kidney disease in patients can help slow progression and reduce cardiovascular events and delay time to kidney failure. The goal of this study is to increase the awareness and management of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients.”
 
 The ADD-CKD study will recruit 460 primary care practitioner providers.  Each provider will recruit 21 type 2 diabetes patients, for a total of 9,660 patients. The study, to be administered by primary care physicians and primary care nurse practitioners will use a primary care provider survey, a patient physical exam and medical history, lab testing, including blood and urine and patient quality of life questionnaires. Enrollment begins in June 2011.

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