Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

Browsing Posts in Uncategorized

Anthony Anderson, co star of upcoming movie Scream 4, and star of Hustle & Flow, Kangaroo Jack, Kingdom Come and detective on NBC’s Law & Order, has Type 2 diabetes and is in Atlanta for Eli Lilly’s Fearless African Americans Connected and Empowered (F.A.C.E.) program. I got a chance to interview the national spokesperson for outreach to African Americans affected by diabetes. Sign up on my website to read and hear my upcoming interview at www.jlewiskemp.com.

In the meantime, listen to Anthony on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.

Anthony Anderson

 

Share

 

MY SWEET LIFE: Successful Women with Diabetes

by Beverly. Adler, PhD, CDE

and friends

 

This book is a collection of life stories – each chapter written by a highly respected successful woman with diabetes.  This group of diverse women share their stories how they find balance between managing their careers and/or family AND managing their diabetes.

MY SWEET LIFE is compiled by Dr. Beverly S. Adler who is also one of those women.  “Dr. Bev” as she is better known, is a clinical psychologist and Certified Diabetes Educator in private practice, specializing treating patients with diabetes and also has had Type 1 Diabetes for 36 years.  All those years ago when she was diagnosed, there were no role models with diabetes for her. This book is geared for women with diabetes who need role models who can inspire them. The book  is written for the newly diagnosed woman with diabetes who is overwhelmed with her diagnosis.  Or, for the woman who has had diabetes for a while, but can also benefit from uplifting, inspirational stories to encourage and motivate self-care (especially if they already are trying to cope with some complications).

She is joined by 27 contributing authors who are all women of exceptional accomplishments! Each story is unique and heartwarming, as these very special women share their triumph over diabetes. The reader can learn how the women’s experiences with diabetes helped to shape them into who they are today. The forward to the book is written by Nicole Johnson – Miss. America 1999. The theme running through the book is that “diabetes is a blessing in disguise.”

 

 

This book is inspirational, motivational, and uplifting!

 

___________________________________________________________________________

 

Contributing authors (in alphabetical order):

Beverly S. Adler, PhD, CDE

Judith Jones Ambrosini

Brandy Barnes, MSW

Lorraine Brooks, MPH

Fran Carpentier

Sheri R. Colberg-Ochs, PhD

Deanna Glick

Riva Greenberg

Carol Grafford, RD, CDE

*Nicole Johnson (*Writing the Forward to the book)

Sally Joy

Zippora Karz

Kelli Kuehne

Kelly Kunik

Jacquie Lewis-Kemp

Joan McGinnis, RN, MSN, CDE

Laura Menninger (aka “The Glucose Goddess”)

Jennifer Nash, PhD

Vanessa Nemeth, MS, MA

Alexis Pollak

Kyrra Richards

Lisa Ritchie

Christina Rowlandson, MS

Mari Ruddy, MA

Cherise Shockley

Kerri Morrone Sparling

Natalie Strand, MD

Amy Tenderich, MA

Heartha Whitlow

Share

A few weeks ago I talked about the old days and the diabetic exchange system diet. It was up to the diabetic to understand and almost commit to memory the exchange system. It has been at least 30 years since this was the way the diabetic diet was managed, but I still remember that 5 cashews equals a fat exchange. Although people believe nuts are high in protein (and they are a source of some protein), they are higher in fat than protein. The diabetic diet is now managed by counting carbohydrate content. As an old timer, I feel something is lost in the nutritional value of the meal when counting carbohydrates only. In this new jack swing system of carbohydrate counting it doesn’t matter if you eat mostly from one food group as long as it meets the carbohydrate count. Man does not live by bread alone, but if he’s carbohydrate counting, who’s to say he can’t live by beer alone?

And who did away with Tes-Tape™? Remember before the days of glucometers and home blood testing, that gray tape dispenser with yellow tape that we had to pee on before each meal? It was ¼ inch wide and you cut off a piece about 2 inches long to pee on to test your urine sugar. It was the closest thing we had to estimate (I mean really guess) at what our blood sugar was. I mean really, how accurately could urine sugar indicate blood sugar?

It wasn’t until I was in high school that I participated in a study of one of the first glucometers. I carried with me to college a 1 ½ foot long by 8 inch wide by 4 inch deep, 40 pound machine with manual gages like an old airplane cockpit. With it was synthetic blood vials used to calibrate the machine whenever it was moved or unplugged; strips, and steel lancets designed to poke a hole in the finger that almost required stitches to stop the bleeding. Test results were complete 2 minutes after the poke and the results were displayed by the hand on the gage stopping on one of four hashes: 0, 120, 240 and 480. If the hand landed between the hashes, you had to estimate the best you could.  

Boy how technology has improved! Today glucometers fit in your pocket, and even come with an ap to record blood sugar and suggest meals or exercise.  Even beyond the snapshot picture that the glucometer provides is another advancement called the Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM). If the glucometer is a snapshot of what your blood sugar is at that moment, the CGM is a video camera of how your blood sugar varies throughout the day. This is valuable information as the diabetic can better schedule and plan rather than prepare for just in case.

Change resulting in progress is good! What are your memories of the good ol days?

Share

Growing children, even high schoolers often have a difficult time managing glucose levels because of the influx of hormones, gym class, academic stress, after school sports and the dietary make up of school lunches.

According to the American Diabetes Association, “Federal laws that protect children with diabetes include Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1991 (originally the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975), and
the Americans with Disabilities Act. Under these laws, diabetes has been considered to be a disability, and it is illegal for schools and/or day care centers to discriminate against children with disabilities. In addition, any school that receives federal funding or any facility considered open to the public must reasonably accommodate the special needs of children with diabetes.”
Indeed, federal law requires an individualized assessment of any child with diabetes. The required accommodations should be provided within the child’s usual school setting with as little disruption to the school’s and the child’s routine as possible and allowing the child full participation in all school activities.

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) encourages the use of a 504 Plan or Individualized Education Plan (IEP) so that medical instructions are clear for educators when needed. You can find an example plan at http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/504/.

For more information with the opportunity to ask questions, the JDRF sponsors a back to school conference:

 

JDRF’s Back-to-School Conference

No Fee to Attend

Everything you need to know about creating

a safe learning environment for students with
diabetes

For parents/caregivers, school administrators
& staff including teachers,

support personnel (lunch room aides and bus
drivers), and school nurses!

August 9, 2011

2011 Club Venetian, 29310 John R Road, Madison
Heights, MI

August 16, 2011

Holiday Inn French Quarter, 10630 Fremont Pike,
Perrysburg, OH

August 23, 2011

Walnut Hills Country Club, 2874 E. Lake Lansing Rd,
East Lansing, MI

Program Hours (each site): 6:00PM-8:00PM

Students with type 1 diabetes need a strong
support network at school to help them manage their diabetes.

JDRF is here to help!

Hear presentations from Certified Diabetes Educators:

Diabetes Basics • Educational tools and templates • The ‘team’ approach to keeping students safe

Receive information from JDRF:

School Advisory Toolkit • Health Care Providers Toolkit • Service & Support Programs

Visit the diabetes vendors in the exhibit area:

Roche Diagnostics, Medtronic, Solara Medical Supplies, Nova Biomedical, Animas, Novo Nordisk

Questions? Contact Denise Pentescu at dpentescu@jdrf.org or 248-936-1284

JDRF’s Back-to-School
Registration Form

Fax to: 248-355-1188 or
Online at: www.JDRFcares.org/ConferenceRegistration

(If you email your registration, include all the
information requested below in the text field)

I will attend:
____ Aug. 9 – Metro Detroit/Madison Heights ____ Aug. 16 – Perrysburg, OH ___ Aug. 23 – Lansing

Contact Name_________________________________________Title ______________________

Email __________________________________________ Phone_________________________

School Name (if
school employee) _________________________________________________________________

Address _______________________________________________________________________

City/State/Zip ____________________________________________________________________

Free Return form no later than one week prior to event date to reserve your seat!  Free

Register
On-Line at www.JDRFcares.org/ConferenceRegistration

Share

Share

When chronic illness hits, we often think of the bad things that the illness brings. With diabetes, we lament over having to take insulin injections, taking other medications and following a diet. Diabetes does in fact require a lot of scheduling and monitoring but with that comes discipline that we can use in other areas of our life.

I can’t tell you how often I used my understanding of diabetes and how my body works to understand other concepts.  For instance, when learning how to develop a Bill of Material to manufacture automotive components, I was taught that each manufacturing process had a cost and the sum of those processes and materials made up the unit cost of the product. Said simply, the piece of steel, plus the labor to form it, plus the cost of painting it, plus the box cost, plus the cost to put it in the box, plus the overhead burden cost equals the “cost” of the product—not the price.  The price resulted in a profit margin markup of that cost.

Well, it was easy for me to conceptualize this BOM (bill of material) cost concept as a carbohydrate counting recipe. When a diabetic eats, it is more than a total caloric counting process. Especially in the 1970s, the diabetic diet was comprised of a total caloric diet broken down into meat, milk, bread (or starch), fat, fruit and vegetable exchanges. Such a diet would include a “bill of material” that may call for 2 bread exchanges, 1 fat exchange, 1 meat exchange, 1 vegetable exchange and 1 milk exchange for dinner. It was up to the diabetic to choose between 1 cup of spaghetti with meat sauce (1 bread and 1 meat), a dinner roll (1 bread), 1tsp. of butter (1 fat), ½ cup of broccoli (1 vegetable) and 1 cup of skim milk (milk exchange); or 1 medium sized lean pork chop (meat), ½ cup corn (bread exchange), ½ cup of green beans (vegetable exchange), 1 cup of skim milk (milk exchange) and ½ cup of vanilla ice cream (1 bread and 1 fat exchange).

In school, teachers call using one concept to teach another the use of pneumonics. This worked for me? What works for you? How has diabetes and it’s management helped you in another unrelated area of life?

Share

Listen as January Jones interviews Jacquie Lewis-Kemp about living with diabetes.

Listen to internet radio with Ms January Jones on Blog Talk Radio

 

 

Share