Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

Browsing Posts tagged chronic kidney disease

Although the hottest of weather, heat warnings and advisories seems to have moved past the metro Detroit area, people with diabetes
and organ transplants should continue to exercise extreme caution.

The effect that the heat can have on diabetes is complex

  • Sweating, which burns calories and therefore lowers blood sugar, can lead to hypoglycemic  episodes (low blood sugar). Heat can also make hyperglycemic episodes more difficult to identify.

  • Dehydration due to excess heat can cause hyperglycemia (high blood sugar).  Since dehydration occurs when there is low fluid level in the blood stream, there is a high concentration of glucose, causing hyperglycemia.

  • Medication, such as insulin, and supplies can be damaged by excess heat and manufacturer’s recommendations regarding storing medication and supplies must be followed.

Recommendations for people with diabetes:

 

  • Drink plenty of fluids

  • Keep water convenient and close by to make hydration a thoughtless effort.

  • Test blood glucose more often than prescribed, particularly if you don’t feel normal. Since the heat’s impact on blood sugar

    control can be varied (heat can make it go both up or down) it is best to know exactly what the blood sugar level is, rather than guess.

  • Keep diabetes medication and supplies cool without subjecting them to freezing temperatures.

Kidney Transplant Patients must also exercise caution in the heat

 

  • Excessive sweating—not even dehydration–can cause creatinine levels (a measure of kidney function) to increase. High creatine levels can potentially lead to kidney transplant rejection, or worsening of chronic kidney disease.

 

Kidney Transplant Patients should:

 

  • Drink more than the 2 liters of doctor prescribed fluid each day.

  • Again, this should be done by always having water, decaffeinated and non alcoholic, beverages handy to sip on all day.

  • Remember, both caffeine and alcohol dehydrate.

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CLICK HERE FOR DAYTON BOOK EXPO

 

Click the link above to hear all the particulars about the Dayton Book

Expo. Let everyone in the Dayton area know about this affair for all

ages.

 

 

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THE NEW INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE VIDEO FEATURING JAMIE BROOKS IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE!

 

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It’s not often that I get involved with my husband’s work. My husband is a funeral director and I have lost both of my parents. Empathizing with families who have lost loved ones, brings a familiar heaviness onto my heart–one that takes a long time to remove, and so I try not to become too involved in my husband’s work.

 

But when he has the honor to work with a family of a person who has donated the gift of life, as a two time organ recipient and member of a donor family myself, I can’t help but feel kinship. Whether or not I know anyone affected by the donated organs, I feel compelled to thank the family . . .  unofficially . . . on behalf of the lives that have been saved and enhanced . . .as a part of my unofficial transplant recipient family.

 

If you know anyone with an organ transplant, you notice a special glimmer in our eyes when we speak to one another.  We all have a special kinship. Not just those of us with kidney transplants, but livers, hearts, lungs, pancreases. We don’t discriminate among transplant recipients–even bone, blood, skin or tissue recipients are cousins of sorts.

 

As 2012 comes to a close, my husband received such an honor. I couldn’t help empathizing with the donor family and how courageous they were in giving the gift of life or carrying out the wishes of the donor to give the gift of life.  I also imagined the other story of the amazing gifts of life that were given to make 2013 a very special New Year.

 

Please share your gift of life story, whether as a donor family or organ or tissue recipient.

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Jacquie Lewis-Kemp

Because I have been affected by both diabetes and chronic kidney disease, it has become my mission to help others by providing information and tips on how best to live with these conditions. Recognizing that all people who suffer from diabetes aren’t necessarily affected by kidney disease, and that not all people affected by chronic kidney disease developed it as a result of diabetes, I have separated the blog subjects into two separate blogs.

Over the coming weeks and by the first week in January, this website will be used primarily to buy books and other information products related to Diabetes Management and Chronic Kidney Disease and Transplant Living.  I will have two separate blog sites, one for Diabetes related matters and another for CKD, organ donation and transplant.

If you have subscribed to www.jlewiskemp.com, initially you will be subscribed to both blog sites, however feel free to only subscribe to the blog site you are interested in if it is only one of the subjects.

Look for my new blogs Diabetes Success and CKD Success.

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I will be hosting a health coaching demonstration targeted specifically for people with Chronic Kidney Disease (whether approaching kidney failuire, on dialysis, waiting for a kidney transplant or post transplant living) on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 at 3 pm,

I will also be hosting a virtual demonstration of health coaching for people with diabetes on Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 7pm.

Transplant Living Wheel

You can participate in an Introduction to Health Coaching on Friday, November 16, 2012 at 3pm by registering at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/160972280

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Managing a chronic illness like diabetes is more an issue of behavioral change than it is a medical treatment. Sure for insulin dependent diabetics, management requires not only learning to administer the injection, but how to manipulate the doses. But the majority of diabetes management involves understanding how various foods and exercise affects blood sugar levels, and learning to orchestrate a routine that keeps a relative flat line of glucose levels within the normal range

The same is true of living on dialysis or transplant living. Other than being compliant with the doctor’s orders, most of the activity while on dialysis or maintaining a healthy transplant, involves a behavioral change.

Many times, dietary restrictions like low sodium, low fat, low glycemic, means that people need to learn to eat and cook differently. Often times this means a change not only for the person afflicted with the chronic condition, but the entire family. For instance, my husband has a condition unrelated to diabetes or transplant that requires him to eat a low sodium diet. Since I prepare about 99.99% of the meals in our house, that means that after a life of no sugar and low carbohydrate diets, I now add to our meals, low sodium! But it doesn’t work if I prepare his meals separately. In a world of processed foods with lots of added salt, eating low sodium is healthy for everyone.

Since a lot of chronic conditions are aided and best managed by lifestyle changes and establishing a routine, I’ve started a health coaching practice which works is concert with your doctor’s care plan. Once your doctor has prescribed the necessary activities, I work with the patient to develop a regimen that makes those changes fall in concert with your current life.

Perhaps the busiest and most difficult to manage time in my life was when I was a dialysis patient. I was CEO of a manufacturing company, married with a son in elementary school. My job was an hour away from my son’s school. He played soccer and went Kumon twice a week after school. Peritoneal dialysis required that I did one midday exchange and connected to a Cycler at night to perform the dialysis as I slept. My diabetes required glucose monitoring four times a day and insulin injections twice a day. Because dialysis can cause the blood pressure to fluctuate to dangerous levels, I also needed to monitor my weight daily and blood pressure several times a day.  At that time I was sodium restricted as well as on a diabetic diet, and so the best way to control sodium and sugar was to prepare meals myself. As a busy wife, mother and CEO, that was more than a notion, but necessary and therefore not impossible.

All of those requirements—medical, occupational and familial could be summarized like this:

  • Eating out had to be a rare treat

  • I needed diabetic and dialysis medication and testing supplies handy at home and at work

  • In order to cook healthy meals and eat at reasonable times, I had to have them prepped to the point of spending an hour to finalize them for dinner.

  • In order to attend my son’s sporting events and participate in the snack schedule or take him to Kumon even when I would normally work late, meant I had to have business resources at home (computer, fax, printer, binding equipment, presentation folders, etc.).

When I finally got my Ultimate Multitasking Routine in swing, this is how it ran…typically.

  • My workday began at 5:30 am in order to disconnect from my cycler, do all of my testing (weight, glucose, blood pressure), take my insulin plan and prep dinner, prepare lunches for everyone to take to school or work, prepare a light breakfast, and if necessary complete any last minute items for work.

  • Our routine was that my husband usually took my son to school and I usually picked him up from school. As they left, I dressed and left for work. My commute was about 45 minutes which allowed me time to clear voicemail and not walk into any surprises.

  • I kept a three drawer plastic storage cabinet under my desk to store a glucometer, testing supplies, dialysis fluid, blood pressure cuff and supplies, an extra pair of pantyhose and nail polish remover—for other emergencies. The key to being compliant with doctor’s orders is to make the process easy to do and have all of the necessary items available. So at midday, I was ready to test and do my midday dialysis exchange. I kept my stock of dialysis fluid replenished by loading up the car on Sunday night and bringing it into the office each Monday morning.

  • If my son had an after school activity, I would also load up the car the night before with the team snack or whatever was necessary so that I could leave work, pick him up from school and be ready with whatever supplies.

  • Because dinner had been prepped that morning, it was usually within an hour of being done, if not crock pot ready. While completing dinner, I supervised my son while doing homework and was available for questions.

  • In the evening, I completed bedtime testing, took medications, and finished any job related work and prepared for the next day.

 

While of course, things didn’t always work out this smoothly, it was my home base, and when things like illness or other family functions got in the way of this routine, I knew where to return.

I would like to help others with chronic conditions to develop the routine that works best for them to be compliant to their doctors orders and live healthy lives without making overwhelming changes to their current lifestyle.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HEALTH COACHING, click on the Health Coaching Tab above.

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This week I celebrate two anniversaries. The first was May 27, 2012. My husband and I celebrated 23 years of marriage. Wow, that’s a long time, especially for a 25 year old, huh? 😉 On May 30 I celebrate 10 years of living with a pancreas transplant.

I would never have imagined that I would one day not have to take an insulin shot! When I was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 7, my grandfather told me while I was in the hospital that we would “pray it [diabetes] away”. My parents worried that I might not learn to take care of myself and instead hope for a miracle.

I had the most wonderful parents who continually made sure that I understood that I could do anything that I wanted to and be anything that I wanted to be as long as I worked hard at it. So instead of sitting by waiting for a miracle cure from God, I worked hard in school and hard at work.

Despite my hard work, my kidneys failed. My brother volunteered to save my life and donate his left kidney. My transplant team had an even more complete plan to treat my kidney disease. Their full plan of action was to perform the kidney transplant to end dialysis, and a pancreas transplant to end the cause of the kidney failure in the first place.

And so, on May 29, 2002, I took my last insulin injection. And on May 30, 2002 my new pancreas provided enough insulin to move glucose from my bloodstream to my cells, and has done so for the last 10 years.

So back to what Granddaddy said. Did he pray my diabetes away? Sure he did, not through a miraculous prong on the head, but through technology and medical science. And despite the fact that Granddaddy has been gone for 28 years, that doesn’t mean that 2002 wasn’t in God’s time.

Actually, I still consider myself diabetic. My body lived through 32 years of diabetes and I still manage some of the long term complications. I received a bronze medal for living with diabetes for 25 years from an insulin manufacturer. Do you think that they will give me the 50 year medal without having bought their product?

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Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

CALENDAR OF EVENTS
04/14/12 Writer’s Expo, The Upper Room, Detroit, MI
04/21/12 Signing Books, God’s World 2-4 PM                 Seven Mile and Schafer in Detroit, MI
04/28/12 Walking with Jackie’s Crew to cure MS              at Covington School, Bloomfield Hills, MI
05/01/12 Advocating diabetes and kidney education programs at the American Diabetes Association and National Kidney Foundation’s        Diabetes & Kidney Day in Lansing, MI
05/12/12 Signing books at Antioch Baptist Church  in Pontiac, MI
8/4-8/12 Signing books at the Bass Mollett booth at the   National Funeral Directors & Morticians Association convention in Las Vegas, NV
09/29/12 University of Michigan Transplant Center’s    Vita Redita Gala & Charity Auction  at THE BIG HOUSE! in Ann Arbor, MI
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