Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

Browsing Posts tagged diabetes management

Holiday drinking while diabetic. Helpful or harmful? Truth is that it is a complex issue.

It certainly depends on a diabetic’s understanding of how alcohol affects the body and how well the diabetic can control his or her glucose levels.

 

Test your knowledge and follow these guidelines from dLife this holiday season.

http://www.dlife.com/diabetes/quiz/showQuiz.html?quizId=20&utm_source=Foodstuff-20111115&utm_medium=eNewsletter&utm_content=Foodstuff-newsletter&utm_term=Focused&utm_campaign=dLife-eNewsletter

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Ray Kroc Biography

 

Claim to Fame: Founder of McDonald’s
Dates: 1902
Date of Death: 1984
Diabetes Type: Unknown

Raymond Albert Kroc, born on October 5, 1902, was an American entrepreneur, most famous for significantly expanding the McDonald’s Corporation. Ray Kroc was a believer in lifelong self-improvement long before it was a popular topic. It was this belief that inspired him on the day he first encountered the concept that would change his life and the way America eats. Despite facing a number of personal obstacles, including diabetes and arthritis, Kroc had a dream that would not quit.

When Kroc saw his first McDonald’s restaurant at the age of 52, he immediately saw its potential to revolutionize the food service industry. Working with Dick and Mac McDonald (who founded the original restaurant in 1940), Kroc built McDonald’s from a single eatery into one of the most universal symbols of our nation’s success.

Dubbed the “Hamburger King”, Kroc was included in the TIME 100 list of the world’s most influential titans of industry, and amassed a $500 million fortune within his lifetime. He passed away on January 14, 1984, just days before the McDonald’s Corporation sold its 50 billionth hamburger.

(source: dLife.com)

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The final risk in our three part series on the long term use of prednisone, is that of Osteoporosis. Tips to reduce that risk include:

Eat and drink milk, yogurt, sardines, orange juice, green leafy vegetables, calcium with Vitamin D supplements, soy products, salmon, nuts & seeds, reduce salt, sunshine (best source of vitamin D).

To get the most out of your bone-boosting diet, you’ll want to do regular weight-bearing exercise. This includes any activity that uses the weight of your body or outside weights to stress the bones and muscles. The result is that your body lays down more bone material, and your bones become denser. Brisk walking, dancing, tennis, and yoga have all been shown to benefit your bones.

(Sources: Encyclopedia.com, Medscape Today, WebMD, Net Doctor.)

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Diabetics are particularly prone to grow vision threatening cataracts. Transplant patients also have an increased risk of developing cataracts  because of the anti rejection drug Prednisone. Because Prednisone is a necessary part of our lives, here are some tips to prevent or reduce the risk of developing cataracts:

Eat foods high in antioxidants, including garlic, onions, beans, vegetables, celery, seaweed, apples, carrots, tomatoes, turnips and oranges.

Reduce or eliminate refined sugars (particularly white sugar, but also fructose, sucrose, fruit juice concentrates, maltose, dextrose, glucose and refined carbohydrates). This includes “natural” drinks that contain a lot of sugar, including fruit juices. Even milk sugar, lactose, found in all dairy products, can contribute to cataract formation, as it destroys gluthathione and Vitamin C in the lens.

Drink eight glasses of water per day. Adequate water intake helps to maintain the flow of nutrients to the lens and to release wastes and toxins from tissues.

Healthy Tips

  • Avoid microwaves. Radiation leakage from microwave ovens is a direct cause of cataracts, so avoid constant peeking into the open door window while you cook. In addition, food proteins exposed to microwaves can become toxic to the lens that is made mostly of protein.
  • Wear 100 per cent ultraviolet blocking sunglasses and a hat, since ultraviolet light from the sun can cause damage to the lens of the eye.
  • Many synthetic chemicals and pharmaceuticals can cause cataracts. Steroids, for example, taken internally or applied to the skin, are a typical cause of cataracts because they block the normal metabolism of connective tissue of which the lens is composed.
  • Cigarette smoking causes about 20 per cent of all cataracts. Men who smoke more than a pack a day increase their risk for cataracts by 205 per cent. For female smokers, the risk of getting cataracts increases 63 per cent. Quitting without supplementing the diet with additional vitamins and minerals doesn’t seem to eliminate the increased risk for almost ten years, probably due to smoking having depleted antioxidant levels in the eye.

(Sources: Encyclopedia.com, Medscape Today, WebMD, Net Doctor.)

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Listen to my interview with Divabetic Blog Talk Radio host Max “Mr. Divabetic” Svadec.

Max Szadec, former Assistant to Luther Vandross

Divabetic® was inspired by the late R & B legend, Luther Vandross, and created and founded by his long-time assistant, Max Szadek. ‘Divabetic’, a combination of the word ‘diabetic’ and the letter ‘V’ for Vandross, evokes feelings of power and positive attitude associated with the great DIVAS Luther loved like Ms. Patti LaBelle. Divabetic® encourages every woman affected by diabetes to take on a diva’s bold sassy personae and posture to help improve the quality of her life. We believe, if we empower the DIVA within you to manage your diabetes properly, you will strive to live life at your best. You may even feel glamorous!

Listen to my interview with Divabetic Blog Talk Radio host Max “Mr. Divabetic” Svadec.

Listen to internet radio with DivaTalkRadio on Blog Talk Radio
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My Sweet Life by Beverly Adler, PhD, CDE and friends

There’s a new book hot off the presses, “My Sweet Life: Successful Women with Diabetes.” Published by PESI HealthCare, “My Sweet Life” is available for pre-order now and will be widely available next month, diabetes month.

“My Sweet Life” brings together stories from more than 20 successful women who don’t live with diabetes, but thrive with diabetes. This book is inspirational for the newly diagnosed diabetic woman and for the seasoned diabetic woman needed new ideas and inspiration to continue striving toward her goals. My Sweet Life is also a perfect reference for the men who care about a woman with diabetes.

Finally, this book is perfect for medical professionals and diabetes educators to be able to share “actual” experience and data points about living with diabetes. I am honored to be joined by an illustrious group of women on this project, through the vision and expertise of Clinical Psychologist and Certified Diabetes Educator, Beverly Adler.

List of Contributors:
Brandy Barnes, MSW
Claire Blum, MS Ed, RN
Lorraine Brooks, MPH, CEAP
Sheri R. Colberg-Ochs, PhD
Carol Grafford, RD, CDE
Riva Greenberg
Connie Hanham-Cain, RN, CDE
Sally Joy
Zippora Karz
Kelli Kuehne
Kelly Kunik
Jacquie Lewis-Kemp
Joan McGinnis, RN, MSN, CDE
Jen Nash, DClinPsy,
Vanessa Nemeth, MS, MA
Alexis Pollak,
Birgitta Rice, MS, RPh, CHES
Kyrra Richards
Lisa Ritchie
Mari Ruddy, MA
Cherise Shockley
Kerri Morrone Sparling
Amy Tenderich, MA

Heartha Whitlow


 

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Listen as Anthony discusses the specific pitfalls

African Americans fall into and become victims of

diabetes.  He offers suggestions to move from apathy

to healthy and fight diabetes.

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It’s great – to be – a Michigan Wolverine! It’s great – to be – a Michigan Wolverine!

The historic night football game against Notre Dame drew 114, 803 of my best friends to this fabulous event.  Despite Michigan’s difficult first quarter of play and Notre Dame’s first score, the second quarter found Michigan making strides to stay in the game.

The Michigan Marching band’s halftime show featured dancers and flag bearers with black body stockings with blue neon lights—cool to watch, but even cooler when they got into formation with the band and created a target for military personnel to parachute from an airplane and land in the Big House. They plummeted to earth wearing cameras on their helmets and the view from high above the Big House was broadcast on the endzone Sony screens.

The fourth quarter of play was intense. In fact the last 1:23 was filled with lead changes, right up until the final: 02 seconds. Michigan pulled off the win 35-31.

My 114, 803 friends and I were so excited about the win that we couldn’t leave the stadium right away. In fact the crowd took over the cheers we wanted to sing and the band had to kind of follow and wait to start their post-game show.

Traffic was horrendous, particularly with the extra security enforcement, closed streets and available parking. With all the extra people, the bus lines were particularly long. There was a lady in line behind us looking for a mint or piece of candy. My husband whispered to me that she was having an insulin reaction.  New security regulations at the Big House now prohibit bringing in any bags including purses. So we women have to make critical decisions about what to stuff our pockets with. Will it be lipstick, keys, ID and cash? Or will it be glucose tablets, keys, ID and cash?

Fortunately as we asked around for something with sugar in it, we found a woman with chocolate covered nuts—not the first choice to cure an insulin reaction (because it is not simple sugar that can be broken down by the body easily), but sugar nonetheless.

Insulin reactions make you feel weak and as I placed my hand on her back to encourage her to get in front of us and perhaps ask people to let her cut the line so that she could sit down on the bus sooner and get back to her purse quicker, I realized that her blood sugar was likely much lower than a simple reaction. The night air was cool, yet her t-shirt was soaked and wet from perspiration. She refused to cut the line and insisted upon waiting for her turn.

Her decision to come unprepared to a game that was delayed with excitement was a dangerous game of Russian Roulette for her.

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Hurricanes Irene and Katrina, terrorist attacks like 911, earthquakes and other disasters have us contemplating emergency preparedness.  What items would you pack up to move out of harm’s way? In the case of a sudden emergency, what items would you grab? Even if there is a fire in your home and you have a quick moment to grab one thing, what would it be?

If you wait to answer these questions when you need to, chances are you won’t grab the right things and you will regret that you didn’t think through these  uestions pre-need and not at-need.  For people with diabetes, organ transplants or other chronic conditions,  the question is critical and the first item is a given–medication,  items 2-10 may vary.

 On September 11, 2001, a good friend of mine was traveling from the Midwest to the West coast.  He called  from his layover in Minneapolis to tell me that the FAA was considering grounding all aircraft.  He had been recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.  So as I listened to him complain about airport hotels and poor restaurant choices, my Type 1 brain immediately began to calculate what I would need. What concerned me was that since he had homes in both locations, he likely wasn’t carrying several days of medication. I interrupted his complaining and asked, “How much medication do you have”? He answered, “Oh, I don’t know.” I asked him to pull it out and count how many days worth of medicine he had.  I listened as he opened pill bottles and counted, and he was comfortable that he had at least a couple weeks of medication. Funny thing is that as he was counting pills, I was thinking of next steps if he didn’t have enough medication.  Time was critical because he would need to call his pharmacist (during business hours in another time zone) to transfer his prescriptions to a local pharmacy, in order to fill them.

Here’s a quick list of items to consider:

Quick Evacuation

 

  1.  Medication
  2.  Medication
  3.  Medication
  4.  Critical / Portable equipment

 

Hours to Evacuate or Move to a limited space in the home

  1. Everything from the quick evacuation, plus
  2. Medical supplies such as glucose tabs, glucometer & supplies
  3. Durable medical equipment (dialysis supplies, heart monitors, etc., breathing machines)
  4. Physician and pharmacy phone numbers
  5. CASH
  6. Water
  7. Non perishable food
  8. Flashlight
  9. Battery operated radio

 

Some of these items can be stored in
one location, so that only a few will need to be gathered in the case of an
emergency. No one wants to imagine such disaster, but it is better to be
prepared and not need it, than to need it and not be prepared.

 

 

 

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Join me at the 2011 International Fuller Woman Expo next

Saturday, September 10, from 11 amuntil 6 pm.

 

W e are pleased to welcome back talk show host, comedian and

actress Ms. Kim Coles as our keynote speaker.  She is best

known for her portrayal of Sinclair on the hit television show,

“Living Single”, a role that garnered her 4 NAACP Image award

nominations. Ms. Coles is the host of the popular game show

“Pay it Forward” on BET, making her the 1st African American

Woman to ever host a primetime game show.

Keynote Speaker-Kim Coles

Kim is ever evolving. In January, she let go of her trademark braids she has had for

20 years to go all natural! This decision to reveal her natural locks tranformed her

in ways of thinking and being. She will speak about her new found freedom that has

made her appreciate who she is even more and how you can find the courage to love

your authentic self !


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