Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

Browsing Posts tagged glucose monitoring

Holiday drinking while diabetic. Helpful or harmful? Truth is that it is a complex issue.

It certainly depends on a diabetic’s understanding of how alcohol affects the body and how well the diabetic can control his or her glucose levels.

 

Test your knowledge and follow these guidelines from dLife this holiday season.

http://www.dlife.com/diabetes/quiz/showQuiz.html?quizId=20&utm_source=Foodstuff-20111115&utm_medium=eNewsletter&utm_content=Foodstuff-newsletter&utm_term=Focused&utm_campaign=dLife-eNewsletter

Share

Listen to my interview with Divabetic Blog Talk Radio host Max “Mr. Divabetic” Svadec.

Max Szadec, former Assistant to Luther Vandross

Divabetic® was inspired by the late R & B legend, Luther Vandross, and created and founded by his long-time assistant, Max Szadek. ‘Divabetic’, a combination of the word ‘diabetic’ and the letter ‘V’ for Vandross, evokes feelings of power and positive attitude associated with the great DIVAS Luther loved like Ms. Patti LaBelle. Divabetic® encourages every woman affected by diabetes to take on a diva’s bold sassy personae and posture to help improve the quality of her life. We believe, if we empower the DIVA within you to manage your diabetes properly, you will strive to live life at your best. You may even feel glamorous!

Listen to my interview with Divabetic Blog Talk Radio host Max “Mr. Divabetic” Svadec.

Listen to internet radio with DivaTalkRadio on Blog Talk Radio
Share

It’s great – to be – a Michigan Wolverine! It’s great – to be – a Michigan Wolverine!

The historic night football game against Notre Dame drew 114, 803 of my best friends to this fabulous event.  Despite Michigan’s difficult first quarter of play and Notre Dame’s first score, the second quarter found Michigan making strides to stay in the game.

The Michigan Marching band’s halftime show featured dancers and flag bearers with black body stockings with blue neon lights—cool to watch, but even cooler when they got into formation with the band and created a target for military personnel to parachute from an airplane and land in the Big House. They plummeted to earth wearing cameras on their helmets and the view from high above the Big House was broadcast on the endzone Sony screens.

The fourth quarter of play was intense. In fact the last 1:23 was filled with lead changes, right up until the final: 02 seconds. Michigan pulled off the win 35-31.

My 114, 803 friends and I were so excited about the win that we couldn’t leave the stadium right away. In fact the crowd took over the cheers we wanted to sing and the band had to kind of follow and wait to start their post-game show.

Traffic was horrendous, particularly with the extra security enforcement, closed streets and available parking. With all the extra people, the bus lines were particularly long. There was a lady in line behind us looking for a mint or piece of candy. My husband whispered to me that she was having an insulin reaction.  New security regulations at the Big House now prohibit bringing in any bags including purses. So we women have to make critical decisions about what to stuff our pockets with. Will it be lipstick, keys, ID and cash? Or will it be glucose tablets, keys, ID and cash?

Fortunately as we asked around for something with sugar in it, we found a woman with chocolate covered nuts—not the first choice to cure an insulin reaction (because it is not simple sugar that can be broken down by the body easily), but sugar nonetheless.

Insulin reactions make you feel weak and as I placed my hand on her back to encourage her to get in front of us and perhaps ask people to let her cut the line so that she could sit down on the bus sooner and get back to her purse quicker, I realized that her blood sugar was likely much lower than a simple reaction. The night air was cool, yet her t-shirt was soaked and wet from perspiration. She refused to cut the line and insisted upon waiting for her turn.

Her decision to come unprepared to a game that was delayed with excitement was a dangerous game of Russian Roulette for her.

Share

Hurricanes Irene and Katrina, terrorist attacks like 911, earthquakes and other disasters have us contemplating emergency preparedness.  What items would you pack up to move out of harm’s way? In the case of a sudden emergency, what items would you grab? Even if there is a fire in your home and you have a quick moment to grab one thing, what would it be?

If you wait to answer these questions when you need to, chances are you won’t grab the right things and you will regret that you didn’t think through these  uestions pre-need and not at-need.  For people with diabetes, organ transplants or other chronic conditions,  the question is critical and the first item is a given–medication,  items 2-10 may vary.

 On September 11, 2001, a good friend of mine was traveling from the Midwest to the West coast.  He called  from his layover in Minneapolis to tell me that the FAA was considering grounding all aircraft.  He had been recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.  So as I listened to him complain about airport hotels and poor restaurant choices, my Type 1 brain immediately began to calculate what I would need. What concerned me was that since he had homes in both locations, he likely wasn’t carrying several days of medication. I interrupted his complaining and asked, “How much medication do you have”? He answered, “Oh, I don’t know.” I asked him to pull it out and count how many days worth of medicine he had.  I listened as he opened pill bottles and counted, and he was comfortable that he had at least a couple weeks of medication. Funny thing is that as he was counting pills, I was thinking of next steps if he didn’t have enough medication.  Time was critical because he would need to call his pharmacist (during business hours in another time zone) to transfer his prescriptions to a local pharmacy, in order to fill them.

Here’s a quick list of items to consider:

Quick Evacuation

 

  1.  Medication
  2.  Medication
  3.  Medication
  4.  Critical / Portable equipment

 

Hours to Evacuate or Move to a limited space in the home

  1. Everything from the quick evacuation, plus
  2. Medical supplies such as glucose tabs, glucometer & supplies
  3. Durable medical equipment (dialysis supplies, heart monitors, etc., breathing machines)
  4. Physician and pharmacy phone numbers
  5. CASH
  6. Water
  7. Non perishable food
  8. Flashlight
  9. Battery operated radio

 

Some of these items can be stored in
one location, so that only a few will need to be gathered in the case of an
emergency. No one wants to imagine such disaster, but it is better to be
prepared and not need it, than to need it and not be prepared.

 

 

 

Share

 

MY SWEET LIFE: Successful Women with Diabetes

by Beverly. Adler, PhD, CDE

and friends

 

This book is a collection of life stories – each chapter written by a highly respected successful woman with diabetes.  This group of diverse women share their stories how they find balance between managing their careers and/or family AND managing their diabetes.

MY SWEET LIFE is compiled by Dr. Beverly S. Adler who is also one of those women.  “Dr. Bev” as she is better known, is a clinical psychologist and Certified Diabetes Educator in private practice, specializing treating patients with diabetes and also has had Type 1 Diabetes for 36 years.  All those years ago when she was diagnosed, there were no role models with diabetes for her. This book is geared for women with diabetes who need role models who can inspire them. The book  is written for the newly diagnosed woman with diabetes who is overwhelmed with her diagnosis.  Or, for the woman who has had diabetes for a while, but can also benefit from uplifting, inspirational stories to encourage and motivate self-care (especially if they already are trying to cope with some complications).

She is joined by 27 contributing authors who are all women of exceptional accomplishments! Each story is unique and heartwarming, as these very special women share their triumph over diabetes. The reader can learn how the women’s experiences with diabetes helped to shape them into who they are today. The forward to the book is written by Nicole Johnson – Miss. America 1999. The theme running through the book is that “diabetes is a blessing in disguise.”

 

 

This book is inspirational, motivational, and uplifting!

 

___________________________________________________________________________

 

Contributing authors (in alphabetical order):

Beverly S. Adler, PhD, CDE

Judith Jones Ambrosini

Brandy Barnes, MSW

Lorraine Brooks, MPH

Fran Carpentier

Sheri R. Colberg-Ochs, PhD

Deanna Glick

Riva Greenberg

Carol Grafford, RD, CDE

*Nicole Johnson (*Writing the Forward to the book)

Sally Joy

Zippora Karz

Kelli Kuehne

Kelly Kunik

Jacquie Lewis-Kemp

Joan McGinnis, RN, MSN, CDE

Laura Menninger (aka “The Glucose Goddess”)

Jennifer Nash, PhD

Vanessa Nemeth, MS, MA

Alexis Pollak

Kyrra Richards

Lisa Ritchie

Christina Rowlandson, MS

Mari Ruddy, MA

Cherise Shockley

Kerri Morrone Sparling

Natalie Strand, MD

Amy Tenderich, MA

Heartha Whitlow

Share

We were both diagnosed diabetic at 7 years old and thanks to the focus diabetes requires, we have Success Despite the Odds.

Sotomayor opens up about her diabetes

By Joan Biskupic, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — The parents of Sonia Sotomayor, the future Supreme Court justice, knew something was wrong when their daughter, 7 years old at the time, was always thirsty, began wetting the bed and fainted in church.

By Charles Rex Arbogast, AP

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor delivers an address at the University of Chicago Law School.

In heartfelt remarks before a group of 150 children Tuesday, Sotomayor recalled being taken to the hospital for tests. When a technician pulled out a needle to draw blood, she was so scared that she tore from the room, ran out of the hospital and hid underneath a parked car. After hospital staff dragged her back, “kicking and screaming,” and completed tests, things turned scarier: Sotomayor was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

It was the first time she saw her mother cry. The doctor told her diabetes wasn’t so bad, and Sotomayor thought, “If it isn’t so bad, why is my mommy crying?”

Sotomayor’s diabetes has long been known, yet she has never spoken so publicly and in such personal terms about her life with the condition. Over the course of a half-hour at a downtown Washington hotel Tuesday, Sotomayor spoke as a group of children in bright blue T-shirts — ages 4 to 17, from around the nation — sat rapt before her on the floor of a large conference room.

She opened her remarks at the event sponsored by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation with the shame of wetting the bed after drinking too much water and the fear of her disease. She quickly moved into how she learned to manage it and the discipline diabetes has given her.

After living with it, she said, she discovered “it wasn’t so bad, but it was still bad.”

She told the children, diabetics like her, that they could become anything they wanted. If you want to be a Supreme Court justice, she said in response to a 10th-grade boy from Michigan, “do the things you like to do and do them well.”

She told one of the smallest girls in the audience, from South Carolina, that life as a diabetic will get better as she grows up, figures out what’s happening to her body and learns to manage her blood sugar.

Sotomayor, who will turn 57 Saturday, said she constantly calculates how a meal will affect her and said that no matter where she is having dinner, she will give herself a shot of insulin. Unlike most of the children in the room who get their insulin through a pump, Sotomayor said she uses needles about four times a day.

The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation estimates that about 3 million people in the USA have type 1 diabetes and, like Sotomayor, must regularly test their blood sugar and give themselves insulin injections.

Sotomayor, whose parents came from Puerto Rico, grew up in the Bronx. When she was 9, her father died. Her mother, who eventually became a nurse, worked long hours to support her daughter and son.

In an era before disposable needles, Sotomayor recalled getting up early to boil water and sterilize needles. She said she was so little, she had to pull a chair over to the stove.

Sotomayor stressed the discipline cultivated over the years, such as learning what foods are best for her. “Unlike other people, I actually pay attention to my body,” she said, noting that she can usually tell when she is getting sick.

The juvenile diabetes foundation says that even with insulin injections, complications from diabetes can arise, such as kidney failure, blindness and heart disease.

Sotomayor went to Princeton University and earned a law degree from Yale. When President Obama appointed her to the Supreme Court in 2009, she became the first Hispanic to sit on the nation’s highest court.

In what she described Tuesday as “the job of my dreams,” Sotomayor said she watches how the stress of the court business might affect her blood-sugar level and always checks it before she takes the bench for the hours-long oral arguments.

She accentuated the positive side of having diabetes, telling the youths, “It affects you in knowing how precious it is to have good health.”

Share