Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

Browsing Posts tagged insulin

Join me and learn how my coaching program works with you to take your doctor’s instructions and create a routine that fits into YOUR lifestyle.

When:

Wednesday, June 26, 2013 at 7 PM (Eastern Time)

Topic:

This will be an online conference that demonstrates my Diabetes Lifestyle Coaching Program. REGISTER HERE

Description:

Life for people with diabetes is not one simple lifestyle, and so no one’s diabetes should be treated the same. We are as individual as snowflakes and that is why coaching to create a plan to tailor your diabetes maintenance to your current lifestyle is a better option than using one set of procedures for prescribed for everyone. I will show you how my program works.

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Chronic diseases or conditions like diabetes, multiple sclerosis, hypoglycemia, asthma, kidney disease, hypertension, heart disease and transplant living all require a regimen that requires strict adherence. Not following these regimens or staying within the guidelines can cause serious problems, long term complications or even sudden death. Almost all of these conditions require a special diet or dietary restrictions.  Some of them can be controlled with diet alone. Others also require medicines and test procedures.

This can seem overwhelming for someone first diagnosed with a chronic illness, and it can continue if the patient doesn’t develop a regimen to accommodate the medicine schedule, the dietary restrictions and timing, and exercise requirements. The restrictions that a chronic condition requires can feel overwhelmingly restrictive, but consider the alternative. If a diabetic doesn’t develop a regimen to consistently take medication, follow a low glycemic diet with the prescribed carbohydrate restrictions and exercise as suggested, then blood sugars can dip too low and cause a severe hypoglycemic reaction resulting in loss of consciousness or even death. Other chronic conditions can result in similar serious conditions as well as sudden death.  This is why a regimen to prevent these severe reactions is important.

How do you manage diabetes? How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time!

In other words, you break down what needs to happen and put it up against your usual daily schedule.

  1. 1. List the things that must be done for proper management of your condition. In the case of diabetes, you would list your dietary requirements and restrictions, your medicine doses and times, your test and exercise requirements/suggestions.

  2. 2. List your normal daily activities and job travel and/or timing requirements. For instance if you work 8am until 5pm, and you travel 10%  of the time, typically Tuesday through Friday.

  3. 3. Now blend the lists by figuring out what the breakfast requirements translate into as far as a meal; what you will eat for lunch (whether purchased at a restaurant or packed in a  brown bag lunch) and how you will complete dinner requirements. When you will test and if you will gets some midday exercise walking outside or to lunch.

  4. 4. You should also write down when you will test during these hours and at home.

  5. 5. Finally look over the list of requirements and make sure that you determine what supplies you need to make this regimen work. For instance, if carrying blood testing supplies and the machine is not convenient, then you might want to consider keeping an  extra set at work in a locker or in your desk. If that means keeping medicine at work as well, make sure to consider the storage requirements of the medication. For instance, insulin doesn’t need to be refrigerated; however it shouldn’t be kept in direct sunlight either.

  6. 6. Schedule time for exercise so that it is not an afterthought that is not done regularly.

The key is to make sure that what your condition requires, you make available and convenient so that it is easy to be compliant to your doctor’s orders.

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Diabetes is a patient managed disease. While doctors measure blood glucose and average glucose levels over 3 months (HbA1C), they are measuring in order to give you, the diabetic patient, feedback on whether your efforts are working to control your diabetes. Doctors also check for long term complications and whether other treatment is necessary to avoid the long term complication or to treat them. Beyond those activities, doctors really cannot control diabetes–only you can.

Let me say it again, DOCTORS CANNOT MANAGE YOUR DIABETES!  Your actions and your commitment to managing this complicated disease will in large part determine your health. The best endocrinologists, internists, specialists and educators cannot control your diabetes, only you can.

But don’t get me wrong, physicians are absolutely key in your diabetes management system. Your best source of how well you’ve been managing your diabetes is likely from your physician. While that information is about past performance, your doctor should recommend ways to improve your glucose control, whether it is diet changes, exercise changes or medication changes.

Another source of good coaching is from diabetes educators who perhaps have more time to teach strategy and technique for glucose control. Education is always key whether you are talking about diabetes or technology–understanding leads to better ability to control.

Having said that, take it upon yourself to map out a way to control your glucose levels as you navigate the sticky road through the holidays. Plan how you will handle company parties, charity functions, family gatherings, and full days of non-stop shopping. Overeating is not the only complication of the season. Forgetting to eat, or not having access to a healthy meal is another. And that is why planning is key.

Also, don’t forget to get some exercise. Unless we’re winter sports fans, it is easy to become sedentary and work behind a computer all day and watch television all night. Plan some exercise, even if it is walking from the back of the mall parking lot, doing laps at the mall or marching up and down a flight stairs in your home or at work 7 times!

Burn those carbohydrates by dancing!

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Listen to my interview with Divabetic Blog Talk Radio host Max “Mr. Divabetic” Svadec.

Max Szadec, former Assistant to Luther Vandross

Divabetic® was inspired by the late R & B legend, Luther Vandross, and created and founded by his long-time assistant, Max Szadek. ‘Divabetic’, a combination of the word ‘diabetic’ and the letter ‘V’ for Vandross, evokes feelings of power and positive attitude associated with the great DIVAS Luther loved like Ms. Patti LaBelle. Divabetic® encourages every woman affected by diabetes to take on a diva’s bold sassy personae and posture to help improve the quality of her life. We believe, if we empower the DIVA within you to manage your diabetes properly, you will strive to live life at your best. You may even feel glamorous!

Listen to my interview with Divabetic Blog Talk Radio host Max “Mr. Divabetic” Svadec.

Listen to internet radio with DivaTalkRadio on Blog Talk Radio
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Listen as Anthony discusses the specific pitfalls

African Americans fall into and become victims of

diabetes.  He offers suggestions to move from apathy

to healthy and fight diabetes.

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Hurricanes Irene and Katrina, terrorist attacks like 911, earthquakes and other disasters have us contemplating emergency preparedness.  What items would you pack up to move out of harm’s way? In the case of a sudden emergency, what items would you grab? Even if there is a fire in your home and you have a quick moment to grab one thing, what would it be?

If you wait to answer these questions when you need to, chances are you won’t grab the right things and you will regret that you didn’t think through these  uestions pre-need and not at-need.  For people with diabetes, organ transplants or other chronic conditions,  the question is critical and the first item is a given–medication,  items 2-10 may vary.

 On September 11, 2001, a good friend of mine was traveling from the Midwest to the West coast.  He called  from his layover in Minneapolis to tell me that the FAA was considering grounding all aircraft.  He had been recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.  So as I listened to him complain about airport hotels and poor restaurant choices, my Type 1 brain immediately began to calculate what I would need. What concerned me was that since he had homes in both locations, he likely wasn’t carrying several days of medication. I interrupted his complaining and asked, “How much medication do you have”? He answered, “Oh, I don’t know.” I asked him to pull it out and count how many days worth of medicine he had.  I listened as he opened pill bottles and counted, and he was comfortable that he had at least a couple weeks of medication. Funny thing is that as he was counting pills, I was thinking of next steps if he didn’t have enough medication.  Time was critical because he would need to call his pharmacist (during business hours in another time zone) to transfer his prescriptions to a local pharmacy, in order to fill them.

Here’s a quick list of items to consider:

Quick Evacuation

 

  1.  Medication
  2.  Medication
  3.  Medication
  4.  Critical / Portable equipment

 

Hours to Evacuate or Move to a limited space in the home

  1. Everything from the quick evacuation, plus
  2. Medical supplies such as glucose tabs, glucometer & supplies
  3. Durable medical equipment (dialysis supplies, heart monitors, etc., breathing machines)
  4. Physician and pharmacy phone numbers
  5. CASH
  6. Water
  7. Non perishable food
  8. Flashlight
  9. Battery operated radio

 

Some of these items can be stored in
one location, so that only a few will need to be gathered in the case of an
emergency. No one wants to imagine such disaster, but it is better to be
prepared and not need it, than to need it and not be prepared.

 

 

 

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