Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

Browsing Posts tagged living with diabetes

Once again, we are excited to present our ‘FREE’ Annual “Taking Diabetes to School 2013” Conference & Exhibits …everything you need to know about creating and maintaining a safe learning environment for students with diabetes.  A strong support network at school is needed to help them manage their diabetes, stay safe and continue learning – JDRF is here to help!

New this year: Hands-on Demo Stations and interactive networking with diabetes educators, clinicians, and parents!

If you have questions or you would like to reserve your spot at this important and informative event, please contact Denise Pentescu at JDRF.

Phone: 517.899.2251

Fax: 248.355.1188

Email dpentescu@jdrf.org

JDRF Registration Form

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Actor Anthony Anderson, Spokesperson for the Eli Lilly’s F.A.C.E. program.

African Americans are diagnosed with diabetes more than 2.5 times the rate of whites. I had the opportunity to interview Anthony Anderson about his ambassador role as national spokesperson for Eli Lilly’s F.A.C.E. program. The Fearless African Americans Connected and Empowered (F.A.C.E.) program is designed specifically to reach African Americans and inform us about how to prevent or manage the epidemic diabetes diagnoses in our community.
Listen to our hilarious interview:

This is part one, stay tuned for part 2.

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Although the hottest of weather, heat warnings and advisories seems to have moved past the metro Detroit area, people with diabetes
and organ transplants should continue to exercise extreme caution.

The effect that the heat can have on diabetes is complex

  • Sweating, which burns calories and therefore lowers blood sugar, can lead to hypoglycemic  episodes (low blood sugar). Heat can also make hyperglycemic episodes more difficult to identify.

  • Dehydration due to excess heat can cause hyperglycemia (high blood sugar).  Since dehydration occurs when there is low fluid level in the blood stream, there is a high concentration of glucose, causing hyperglycemia.

  • Medication, such as insulin, and supplies can be damaged by excess heat and manufacturer’s recommendations regarding storing medication and supplies must be followed.

Recommendations for people with diabetes:

 

  • Drink plenty of fluids

  • Keep water convenient and close by to make hydration a thoughtless effort.

  • Test blood glucose more often than prescribed, particularly if you don’t feel normal. Since the heat’s impact on blood sugar

    control can be varied (heat can make it go both up or down) it is best to know exactly what the blood sugar level is, rather than guess.

  • Keep diabetes medication and supplies cool without subjecting them to freezing temperatures.

Kidney Transplant Patients must also exercise caution in the heat

 

  • Excessive sweating—not even dehydration–can cause creatinine levels (a measure of kidney function) to increase. High creatine levels can potentially lead to kidney transplant rejection, or worsening of chronic kidney disease.

 

Kidney Transplant Patients should:

 

  • Drink more than the 2 liters of doctor prescribed fluid each day.

  • Again, this should be done by always having water, decaffeinated and non alcoholic, beverages handy to sip on all day.

  • Remember, both caffeine and alcohol dehydrate.

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Jacquie diagnosed with T1D at age 7

Many people tend to categorize Type 1 diabetes as a “worse” case of diabetes than Type 2.  The fact of the matter is that while they are both diabetes–an endocrine disorder whereby the body cannot move glucose from the blood stream to feed the cells–the reasons for the disorder are different. Because the reasons are different, the treatment is often different.

 

People with Type 1 diabetes always take insulin injections because the reason for their inability to move glucose to the cells is because their pancreas doesn’t produce insulin at all. Therefore the only way to complete the digestive process is with insulin injections.

 

People with Type 2 diabetes develop it for a number of different reasons. Some suffer from insulin resistance, meaning that their pancreas’ produce insulin, however their bodies have become resistant to the insulin and oral medication is needed to make the insulin work or work more efficiently.

 

Others with Type 2 diabetes have undergone a major change (weight gain, stress etc.) that increases the amount of insulin required for digestion. Sometimes the pancreas can be stimulated with oral medications to produce more insulin, however in other cases insulin injection therapy is needed.

 

So as you can see, there is no “worse” case of diabetes, just differences in how they are treated.

 

To  answer to my own question, I do have an opinion about which type is easier to manage. Type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed in children, hence the earlier description “juvenile diabetes”. Type 2 often occurs in older adults. Managing diabetes is a lifestyle change, and for children, it is creating a lifestyle–not changing it.

 

Many people have difficulty managing Type 2 Diabetes because it is a lifestyle change more than adding a pill a day, but includes blood testing, weight management, exercise for more than just pleasure and following a diet.  I believe that people managing Type 1 diabetes have it easier because they created a lifestyle as a child that they have adapted to their routine as they grew older.

 

For example, I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the age of 7.  It was August, two months after my baby brother was born and a month before second grade started. In fact I missed a few weeks of the start of school because in 1969, patients with diabetes were hospitalized while they learned to manage, and doctors determined what dose of insulin to prescribe (Boy was this old school). In 1969, there was no such thing as a glucometer and patients were prescribed an insulin dose to take for six months until the next doctor’s visit and a blood glucose test could be done.

 

It wasn’t until my junior year of high school that I participated in a study with a new machine called a glucometer. It was the size of an old cassette tape machine and weighed about 40 pounds. The machine had to be calibrated with synthetic blood anytime the machine was turned off–oh yeah, it had to be plugged in. While this doesn’t sound convenient or conducive to anyone’s lifestyle, it was a major step in managing diabetes. Once I graduated from college, glucometers became pocket sized and much more portable. With this new technology, I was “able” to do nearly anything.

 

One of the most important things my parents taught me when I was diagnosed with diabetes, was that I can do anything that I wanted to do as long as I was willing to work hard at it. While technology made it possible to manage a busy lifestyle, it was my parent’s words that continue to ring in my ears and hopefully have been passed on to my son’s ears. With that mantra, it was relatively easy to modify my regimen from high school cheerleading, to walking the campus to class; from school to work and the impact on my blood sugar of emotions during meetings or public speaking. Adding marriage, childbirth and a young family to the mix was more an organizational feat than it was a procedural change.

 

So the next time you see a child with diabetes, don’t hang your head in sorrow because of her diabetes. Know that she is preparing for a busy life ahead.

 

Wife, Mom & CEO managing T1D

 

 

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Join me and learn how my coaching program works with you to take your doctor’s instructions and create a routine that fits into YOUR lifestyle.

When:

Wednesday, June 26, 2013 at 7 PM (Eastern Time)

Topic:

This will be an online conference that demonstrates my Diabetes Lifestyle Coaching Program. REGISTER HERE

Description:

Life for people with diabetes is not one simple lifestyle, and so no one’s diabetes should be treated the same. We are as individual as snowflakes and that is why coaching to create a plan to tailor your diabetes maintenance to your current lifestyle is a better option than using one set of procedures for prescribed for everyone. I will show you how my program works.

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What to eat when dinning out?

…from the U-M Comprehensive Diabetes Center

Tips for dining out

Adapted from a forthcoming publication by the U-M Adult Outpatient Diabetes Education Program.

Dining out can be one of life’s pleasures. You can enjoy yourself and still take care of your diabetes. It takes some planning and asking for what you need to achieve this goal. Also, the more you measure food portions at home, the better you can estimate portion sizes when dining out.

Here are some tips to get you started!

  • Choose a restaurant that offers      heart healthy options. Some helpful websites to help you find one are the      Healthy Dining Finder from the American Heart Association (HealthyDiningfinder.com)      or calorieking.com.

  • Some restaurants have their own      websites with menus that you can review in advance, or ask for a nutrition      guide at the restaurant.

  • Ask how a food is prepared and      steer away from gravies and cream sauces.

  • Read the menu creatively. Order      fresh fruit from the breakfast menu, or choose an appetizer and a salad as      a dinner entrée.

  • Choose a smaller portion from      the lunch menu, or split a meal with someone.

  • To control portions, ask for a      “to-go container” to be served with your meal. When your meal      arrives, portion out what you would like to eat, then put the rest in the      container.

  • Ask for substitutions. If your      meal comes with French fries, ask if you can substitute vegetables.

  • Choose no-calorie beverages      such as water, club soda or diet pop.

  • Be choosy at salad bars. Choose      greens, vegetables and beans. Limit the higher calorie foods such as      prepared salads (for example, potato or macaroni salad).

  • Plan ahead for desserts and eat      slowly; share your dessert with someone.

  • Avoid the      “value-sized” options (supersized, jumbo, giant, deluxe) and      order a regular or junior-sized sandwich instead.

  • Skip the French fries, choose      fruit or a salad with low-calorie dressing or flavored vinegar instead.

  • Choose grilled chicken instead      of breaded, fried chicken.

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Come out May 18, 2013 to join a fabulous gathering of people with diabetes, medical professionals and researchers for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s DIABETES TODAY AND TOMORROW. This year’s theme is

Diabetes in the Age of Technology

This is an educational and networking conference for persons living with type 1 diabetes and insulin dependent type 2 diabetes, their families, and the medical care community.

Registration is free and can be done online at www.jdrfmichiganeast.com.

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It’s not often that I get involved with my husband’s work. My husband is a funeral director and I have lost both of my parents. Empathizing with families who have lost loved ones, brings a familiar heaviness onto my heart–one that takes a long time to remove, and so I try not to become too involved in my husband’s work.

 

But when he has the honor to work with a family of a person who has donated the gift of life, as a two time organ recipient and member of a donor family myself, I can’t help but feel kinship. Whether or not I know anyone affected by the donated organs, I feel compelled to thank the family . . .  unofficially . . . on behalf of the lives that have been saved and enhanced . . .as a part of my unofficial transplant recipient family.

 

If you know anyone with an organ transplant, you notice a special glimmer in our eyes when we speak to one another.  We all have a special kinship. Not just those of us with kidney transplants, but livers, hearts, lungs, pancreases. We don’t discriminate among transplant recipients–even bone, blood, skin or tissue recipients are cousins of sorts.

 

As 2012 comes to a close, my husband received such an honor. I couldn’t help empathizing with the donor family and how courageous they were in giving the gift of life or carrying out the wishes of the donor to give the gift of life.  I also imagined the other story of the amazing gifts of life that were given to make 2013 a very special New Year.

 

Please share your gift of life story, whether as a donor family or organ or tissue recipient.

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When you decide not to listen to your doctor’s advice and eat whenever you want to or miss doses of critical medication, what’s the big deal? You’re only hurting yourself, right? Wrong! YOUR NONCOMPLIANCE AFFECTS EVERYONE AROUND YOU!

 

A woman living in the sandwich generation (sandwiched by needing to take care of college students and aging parents) was perplexed because her mother complained that she never visited her father. The woman’s parents were both in their eighties and somehow Stephanie found it difficult between work and immediate family commitments to visit her parents.

 

Stephanie’s father suffered from insulin-dependent Type 2 diabetes and found it difficult to walk and to see due to the onset of neuropathy and retinopathy, complications of uncontrolled diabetes. He especially felt bad when Stephanie would abruptly end a phone call needing to return to work, and forgetting to return the call.

 

One day after receiving a tongue lashing from her mother about not visiting them and her father in particular, Stephanie decided to confide in a close friend about the situation. Stephanie’s friend listened intently and explained,

 

“Stephanie, I know you well and I know how much you love your parents. I also know that you find conflict challenging. Diabetes, left uncontrolled can lead to very debilitating illnesses. I believe that the reason that you haven’t made time for your father is because you have watched him ignore advice from his doctor, refuse to monitor his glucose and eat regularly. As a result, he walks with a cane and is losing his sight. He has passed out requiring EMS to treat ailments that wouldn’t occur if he better managed his diabetes.

 

What happens when people see an accident about to happen? When two trains are barreling down the track toward one another? They look away don’t they? No one wants to watch something bad happen. And so I think you subconsciously don’t visit your parents to avoid seeing the train wreck about to happen–what will likely happen to your father if he doesn’t get serious about controlling his diabetes.”

 

This holiday season, if you don’t take care of yourself for you, do it for someone who loves you.

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Diabetes and Christmas

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Try these tips for festive gatherings this holiday season, brought to you from across the pond.

 Christmas brings seasonal joy and the comfort of the family. With a wealth of food available though, it can also be a trying time.

 

Keeping discipline to control sugar levels and portions can be particularly difficult.

 So for those of us for who willpower doesn’t come too easily, here are our tips for enjoying sensible eating at Christmas.

Commit yourself to a food plan

It’s very easy to get carried away by what’s on the table. To reduce the chance of this happening plan how much you intend to eat and make a point of sticking to it. If you’re not cooking, find out what will be served in advance.

 For sensible drinking see Diabetes and alcohol

 It’s best to make this plan at a time when you’re not hungry as hunger can distort your judgement. Don’t forget to factor in that alcohol contains high calorie content and also causes sugar levels to fluctuate.

Plan how much or whether you will drink and stick to this too.

 

It’s a good idea to let you your family know in advance of the Christmas meal too so they won’t offer you anything you’ve planned not to have.

Avoid feeling hungry for too long

It’s a well drilled family that gets the Christmas meal to the table on time. If the meal is taking longer to prepare, it can lead to an unusually long period of hunger and anticipation. 

Say you actually wanted to overeat, the best way would be to make yourself very hungry before eating.

One way to avoid being so ravenous is to break the delay.

 Protein and/or non-starchy vegetable based pre-meal snacks are a good choice as they are filling and slowly broken down.

Have a glass of water before eating

Having a glass of water before you start your meal is an easy and effective way of reducing your food intake; it makes you feel full earlier on, thus reducing your appetite.

Base your meal on non-starchy vegetables

Vegetables are the staple of sensible eating. Make sure that vegetables account for a good percentage of your plate.

Eat gradually

Eating with the family is a nice occasion but if you’re a fast eater, it can make things more difficult. If others are still eating, you may be tempted to have another helping. 

Eating slowly will help with this and will also allow you to savor and better enjoy the food you’re eating.

Don’t feel guilty about turning offers down

Any food you eat is going to end up in your blood stream and on your body so don’t feel shy about turning food down

Feeling stuffed can be quite unpleasant by itself and it’s also worth bearing in mind that the body’s natural reaction to having to digest a particularly large meal is to release extra sugar into the bloodstream.

Go easy on the puddings

One can be forgiven for indulging every once in a while. If you’re a pudding person Christmas can be something of a trial of restraint though. If you cannot resist pudding make sure you stick to at most one and keep the serving sensible, remembering that sweet dishes are very fast absorbed. Once again apply the rule about eating gradually.

After and between meals put foods away or under cover

Remember the classic Christmas cracker joke about a ‘sea food’ diet – “I see food and I eat it”? Food left out and exposed grabs the eye, therefore grabbing the attention of the mind and this can all too easily lead to ‘small’ indulgences. 

A couple of mince pies will typically have over 500 calories, a quarter of a woman’s daily energy, and a fifth of a man’s; not forgetting the 70 plus grams of fast acting carbohydrates. Apply the rule ‘out of sight, out of mind’ and this can help to avoid between meal snacking.

Walk away from the craving

If temptation is proving a taxing task and hard to avoid, it can help to literally walk away from the craving. A 20 minute walk in the crisp air should be enough to increase endorphins and serotonin which can help to overcome cravings.

Test your blood where possible

If you self test, commit yourself to testing your blood sugar more regularly, over the Christmas period, to catch those blood sugar fluctuations early.

 

Reprinted from http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-christmas.html

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