Andrea Boccelli

Did you know that Andrea Bocelli is blind? You know Bocelli, the opera singer known as the fourth tenor and disciple of Lucciano Pavaratti. I didn’t know that, and just the other day I watched the PBS fundraiser that featured Tony Bennett’s Duets II CD and Bocelli is one of the vocal collaborators. No, I’m no opera buff, but I enjoy classical music while writing and like to understand the music.

To listen to Bocelli’s classically trained voice is romantic bliss, even as my fingers type along the keyboard. It doesn’t surprise me that he is blind however, for there have been several other great singers and musicians who are blind—Stevie Wonder, Diane Shuur, Ray Charles, Jose Feliciano just to name a few. It’s just that when a person perfects their craft, you imagine that they used all of their resources to achieve it. How does one understand beauty without sight?

Therein lies the complexity of perfection. Perhaps it is not the quantity of resources or specific resources that reach perfection, but the desire to reach perfection.

I don’t believe it ends with music and blindness. Chronic illness does lots of things to us—makes us tired, susceptible to other illnesses and infection which create another list of problems in addition to the ones we already deal with on a daily basis. It can appear to be a downward spiral if we don’t keep that saying in mind, “When one door closes, another opens”. Bocelli can’t read music and so he overcompensates by listening. In other words, because kidney failure or a heart condition forces you to change direction, it doesn’t mean that you cannot perfect another craft; maybe even something that you really wanted, rather than what you’ve been doing.

So how do you make that transition from the closed to the open door? Here are some suggestions

  1. 1.     Recall what some of the things you’ve always wanted to do are, but somehow never got around to them. Perhaps school took you in a different direction—accounting instead of guitar; maybe the man (or woman) of your dreams came along and instead of pursuing your dream, you were pursued; maybe starting a family got in the way of the perfect career. Think back to what got you up without an alarm clock.

 

  1. 2.     What do you enjoy doing most? Optimally we are already living the dream! Maybe you have already made a career of what you love most. And if you have, great, figure out how to do it in harmony with the medical deficits that you may now have. But if you weren’t living the dream, really reach back and imagine what makes you most happy.

 

  1. 3.     What do you need this new venture to do? Is it a hobby or a job? If you are already independently wealthy, perhaps you don’t need to make what you love earn a living. And even in that case, a hobby that you love and can perfect is important to self worth. We all need a project, or something that adds to our value. But if you are one of the 99% of us, and need that project to also earn a living, then you need a plan for that to happen.

 

 

  1. 4.     How can you make money doing it? Explore all the ways people earn a living doing what you love to do. Imagine yourself doing it and what you would need in the way of support, materials, time and routine.

 

  1. 5.     Finally, say it out loud so that others will hold you accountable, practice and perfect it!

 

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