Blessed Assurance: Success Despite the Odds

by Jacquie Lewis-Kemp, Author & Health Coach for Living life with diabetes and organ transplants, rather than limiting life because of them.

Browsing Posts tagged type 2 diabetes

Chronic diseases or conditions like diabetes, multiple sclerosis, hypoglycemia, asthma, kidney disease, hypertension, heart disease and transplant living all require a regimen that requires strict adherence. Not following these regimens or staying within the guidelines can cause serious problems, long term complications or even sudden death. Almost all of these conditions require a special diet or dietary restrictions.  Some of them can be controlled with diet alone. Others also require medicines and test procedures.

This can seem overwhelming for someone first diagnosed with a chronic illness, and it can continue if the patient doesn’t develop a regimen to accommodate the medicine schedule, the dietary restrictions and timing, and exercise requirements. The restrictions that a chronic condition requires can feel overwhelmingly restrictive, but consider the alternative. If a diabetic doesn’t develop a regimen to consistently take medication, follow a low glycemic diet with the prescribed carbohydrate restrictions and exercise as suggested, then blood sugars can dip too low and cause a severe hypoglycemic reaction resulting in loss of consciousness or even death. Other chronic conditions can result in similar serious conditions as well as sudden death.  This is why a regimen to prevent these severe reactions is important.

How do you manage diabetes? How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time!

In other words, you break down what needs to happen and put it up against your usual daily schedule.

  1. 1. List the things that must be done for proper management of your condition. In the case of diabetes, you would list your dietary requirements and restrictions, your medicine doses and times, your test and exercise requirements/suggestions.

  2. 2. List your normal daily activities and job travel and/or timing requirements. For instance if you work 8am until 5pm, and you travel 10%  of the time, typically Tuesday through Friday.

  3. 3. Now blend the lists by figuring out what the breakfast requirements translate into as far as a meal; what you will eat for lunch (whether purchased at a restaurant or packed in a  brown bag lunch) and how you will complete dinner requirements. When you will test and if you will gets some midday exercise walking outside or to lunch.

  4. 4. You should also write down when you will test during these hours and at home.

  5. 5. Finally look over the list of requirements and make sure that you determine what supplies you need to make this regimen work. For instance, if carrying blood testing supplies and the machine is not convenient, then you might want to consider keeping an  extra set at work in a locker or in your desk. If that means keeping medicine at work as well, make sure to consider the storage requirements of the medication. For instance, insulin doesn’t need to be refrigerated; however it shouldn’t be kept in direct sunlight either.

  6. 6. Schedule time for exercise so that it is not an afterthought that is not done regularly.

The key is to make sure that what your condition requires, you make available and convenient so that it is easy to be compliant to your doctor’s orders.

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Soul Food has been the blame for Type 2 diabetes and uncontrolled Type 1 diabetes for years.  One of the reasons that it has not been quickly eliminated from the diet of African Americans is because of the social role these foods have played throughout history.  Much like the movie “Soul Food”, the Sunday Diner and family contribution to its preparation is what has historically kept families together.  Therefore for the sake of the African American family, we must find a way to uphold this ritual and at the same time reverse the effects it has on diabetes and heart disease.

Many of the foods are in fact healthy and nutrient filled at the start.  It is often the preparation styles that rid the foods of their cancer fighting and sometimes blood pressure lowering nutrients.  Adding excess salt and fat also cause some dishes to be unhealthy. With a few slight changes, soul food can become not just good to you, but good for you.

Low-Sodium Selections

Traditional soul food is high in sodium or salt. Replace
table salt with sea salt. This type of salt has a strong flavor, and you won’t
need to use too much of it to get the flavor you desire. Select foods that say
“reduced” or “low-sodium” on the labels. Include dried or fresh herbs and spices
in your favorite soul food recipes to add flavor without adding
salt.

 

Low-Fat Diet Options

Traditional soul foods can be high in unhealthy fat,
such as saturated and trans fat. Soulfoodandsoutherncooking.com suggests
replacing traditional soul food ham hock with smoked turkey and using turkey
bacon instead of pork bacon. Breading and frying meat and poultry are typical
soul food preparations. Select a lean cut of beef or skinless chicken breast,
which are low in saturated fat. Coat the protein with flour, egg wash and
crushed-up corn-flake cereal. You can add your favorite seasonings such as sea
salt or dried herbs. Spray a cookie sheet with a nonstick spray and bake the
meat until done. This cooking method cuts out the fat from battering and
frying.

Balanced Carbohydrate and Veggie Options

Soul foods include starchy vegetables such as corn,
potatoes and peas. You can still enjoy these foods while having diabetes, but
you need to balance them with some nonstarchy vegetables. Enjoy steamed green
leafy vegetables alongside your starchy veggies. Prepare collard greens, spinach
or kale in a hot saute pan with a splash of red wine vinegar. Drizzle the cooked
greens with heart-healthy olive oil, and sprinkle with sea salt to finish.
Black-eyed peas are a staple of soul food. Pair these simple carbohydrates with
complex carbohydrates such as brown or wild rice. Simple carbs break down
quickly and may cause a spike in your blood sugar. Pairing them with complex
carbs may help to stabilize your blood sugar since foods with complex carbs take
longer to break down.

Replacements in Baked Goods

When baking biscuits or cornbread, replace fatty
buttermilk with a reduced-fat milk. Whipped cream is a delicious addition to
homemade apple pie. Replace half the heavy whipping cream with reduced-fat milk
to shave some fat. Use 1 percent or skim milk in recipes that traditionally call
for whole milk.

Different Fats and Oils

Fill your diet with heart-healthy fats, such as
monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and omega fatty acids. Use healthy oils such as
olive, vegetable and corn oil in your cooking. Replace butter with margarine.
Include some nuts that are high in monounsaturated fats, such as almonds,
cashews and walnuts.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/328360-soul-food-diet-for-diabetics/#ixzz1lf3mTmIx

 

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THE GOOD NEWS

Jill Scott recently opened up about her weight-loss secrets saying her diverse exercise  routine, which includes boxing and biking has made the journey worthwhile. “We  have fun!” she told Us Weekly referring to her workouts with her trainer.

Keeping things fun has helped Jill shed the weight –and keep it off — for two years now. She says that taking charge of her health became a priority  when she became a mom. “There’s a world of discovery in [my  son’s] eyes, and I want to be around to enjoy it!” GO GIRL!

Jill Scott has Type 2 diabetes and shows off her curves and new found energy in this video, “So In Love With You” with Anthony Hamilton.

 

 

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Diabetes is a patient managed disease. While doctors measure blood glucose and average glucose levels over 3 months (HbA1C), they are measuring in order to give you, the diabetic patient, feedback on whether your efforts are working to control your diabetes. Doctors also check for long term complications and whether other treatment is necessary to avoid the long term complication or to treat them. Beyond those activities, doctors really cannot control diabetes–only you can.

Let me say it again, DOCTORS CANNOT MANAGE YOUR DIABETES!  Your actions and your commitment to managing this complicated disease will in large part determine your health. The best endocrinologists, internists, specialists and educators cannot control your diabetes, only you can.

But don’t get me wrong, physicians are absolutely key in your diabetes management system. Your best source of how well you’ve been managing your diabetes is likely from your physician. While that information is about past performance, your doctor should recommend ways to improve your glucose control, whether it is diet changes, exercise changes or medication changes.

Another source of good coaching is from diabetes educators who perhaps have more time to teach strategy and technique for glucose control. Education is always key whether you are talking about diabetes or technology–understanding leads to better ability to control.

Having said that, take it upon yourself to map out a way to control your glucose levels as you navigate the sticky road through the holidays. Plan how you will handle company parties, charity functions, family gatherings, and full days of non-stop shopping. Overeating is not the only complication of the season. Forgetting to eat, or not having access to a healthy meal is another. And that is why planning is key.

Also, don’t forget to get some exercise. Unless we’re winter sports fans, it is easy to become sedentary and work behind a computer all day and watch television all night. Plan some exercise, even if it is walking from the back of the mall parking lot, doing laps at the mall or marching up and down a flight stairs in your home or at work 7 times!

Burn those carbohydrates by dancing!

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Holiday drinking while diabetic. Helpful or harmful? Truth is that it is a complex issue.

It certainly depends on a diabetic’s understanding of how alcohol affects the body and how well the diabetic can control his or her glucose levels.

 

Test your knowledge and follow these guidelines from dLife this holiday season.

http://www.dlife.com/diabetes/quiz/showQuiz.html?quizId=20&utm_source=Foodstuff-20111115&utm_medium=eNewsletter&utm_content=Foodstuff-newsletter&utm_term=Focused&utm_campaign=dLife-eNewsletter

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Listen as Anthony discusses the specific pitfalls

African Americans fall into and become victims of

diabetes.  He offers suggestions to move from apathy

to healthy and fight diabetes.

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It’s great – to be – a Michigan Wolverine! It’s great – to be – a Michigan Wolverine!

The historic night football game against Notre Dame drew 114, 803 of my best friends to this fabulous event.  Despite Michigan’s difficult first quarter of play and Notre Dame’s first score, the second quarter found Michigan making strides to stay in the game.

The Michigan Marching band’s halftime show featured dancers and flag bearers with black body stockings with blue neon lights—cool to watch, but even cooler when they got into formation with the band and created a target for military personnel to parachute from an airplane and land in the Big House. They plummeted to earth wearing cameras on their helmets and the view from high above the Big House was broadcast on the endzone Sony screens.

The fourth quarter of play was intense. In fact the last 1:23 was filled with lead changes, right up until the final: 02 seconds. Michigan pulled off the win 35-31.

My 114, 803 friends and I were so excited about the win that we couldn’t leave the stadium right away. In fact the crowd took over the cheers we wanted to sing and the band had to kind of follow and wait to start their post-game show.

Traffic was horrendous, particularly with the extra security enforcement, closed streets and available parking. With all the extra people, the bus lines were particularly long. There was a lady in line behind us looking for a mint or piece of candy. My husband whispered to me that she was having an insulin reaction.  New security regulations at the Big House now prohibit bringing in any bags including purses. So we women have to make critical decisions about what to stuff our pockets with. Will it be lipstick, keys, ID and cash? Or will it be glucose tablets, keys, ID and cash?

Fortunately as we asked around for something with sugar in it, we found a woman with chocolate covered nuts—not the first choice to cure an insulin reaction (because it is not simple sugar that can be broken down by the body easily), but sugar nonetheless.

Insulin reactions make you feel weak and as I placed my hand on her back to encourage her to get in front of us and perhaps ask people to let her cut the line so that she could sit down on the bus sooner and get back to her purse quicker, I realized that her blood sugar was likely much lower than a simple reaction. The night air was cool, yet her t-shirt was soaked and wet from perspiration. She refused to cut the line and insisted upon waiting for her turn.

Her decision to come unprepared to a game that was delayed with excitement was a dangerous game of Russian Roulette for her.

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Hurricanes Irene and Katrina, terrorist attacks like 911, earthquakes and other disasters have us contemplating emergency preparedness.  What items would you pack up to move out of harm’s way? In the case of a sudden emergency, what items would you grab? Even if there is a fire in your home and you have a quick moment to grab one thing, what would it be?

If you wait to answer these questions when you need to, chances are you won’t grab the right things and you will regret that you didn’t think through these  uestions pre-need and not at-need.  For people with diabetes, organ transplants or other chronic conditions,  the question is critical and the first item is a given–medication,  items 2-10 may vary.

 On September 11, 2001, a good friend of mine was traveling from the Midwest to the West coast.  He called  from his layover in Minneapolis to tell me that the FAA was considering grounding all aircraft.  He had been recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.  So as I listened to him complain about airport hotels and poor restaurant choices, my Type 1 brain immediately began to calculate what I would need. What concerned me was that since he had homes in both locations, he likely wasn’t carrying several days of medication. I interrupted his complaining and asked, “How much medication do you have”? He answered, “Oh, I don’t know.” I asked him to pull it out and count how many days worth of medicine he had.  I listened as he opened pill bottles and counted, and he was comfortable that he had at least a couple weeks of medication. Funny thing is that as he was counting pills, I was thinking of next steps if he didn’t have enough medication.  Time was critical because he would need to call his pharmacist (during business hours in another time zone) to transfer his prescriptions to a local pharmacy, in order to fill them.

Here’s a quick list of items to consider:

Quick Evacuation

 

  1.  Medication
  2.  Medication
  3.  Medication
  4.  Critical / Portable equipment

 

Hours to Evacuate or Move to a limited space in the home

  1. Everything from the quick evacuation, plus
  2. Medical supplies such as glucose tabs, glucometer & supplies
  3. Durable medical equipment (dialysis supplies, heart monitors, etc., breathing machines)
  4. Physician and pharmacy phone numbers
  5. CASH
  6. Water
  7. Non perishable food
  8. Flashlight
  9. Battery operated radio

 

Some of these items can be stored in
one location, so that only a few will need to be gathered in the case of an
emergency. No one wants to imagine such disaster, but it is better to be
prepared and not need it, than to need it and not be prepared.

 

 

 

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Join me at the 2011 International Fuller Woman Expo next

Saturday, September 10, from 11 amuntil 6 pm.

 

W e are pleased to welcome back talk show host, comedian and

actress Ms. Kim Coles as our keynote speaker.  She is best

known for her portrayal of Sinclair on the hit television show,

“Living Single”, a role that garnered her 4 NAACP Image award

nominations. Ms. Coles is the host of the popular game show

“Pay it Forward” on BET, making her the 1st African American

Woman to ever host a primetime game show.

Keynote Speaker-Kim Coles

Kim is ever evolving. In January, she let go of her trademark braids she has had for

20 years to go all natural! This decision to reveal her natural locks tranformed her

in ways of thinking and being. She will speak about her new found freedom that has

made her appreciate who she is even more and how you can find the courage to love

your authentic self !


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5/17/2011

The National Kidney Foundation is launching a multi-site cross-sectional study, Awareness, Detection and Drug Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Kidney Disease (ADD-CKD). The study will assess how chronic kidney disease is being identified and managed in type II diabetic patients, in the primary care setting.

Recent research has shown that primary care physicians are extremely busy and have little time to spend discussing risk factors and preventative steps with patients at risk for kidney disease. One study found that only half of primary care doctors discussed chronic kidney disease, with their diabetic patients. And when it was discussed, half of doctors spoke about CKD for 33 seconds or less – an average of only 3% of the total visit time.
 
“Primary care physicians are our first line of defense against one of the world’s top killers,” said Lynda Szczech, MD, MSCE, President of the National Kidney Foundation. “More than 26 million Americans already have chronic kidney disease, and millions more are at risk and don’t even know it.  Early detection and treatment of kidney disease in patients can help slow progression and reduce cardiovascular events and delay time to kidney failure. The goal of this study is to increase the awareness and management of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients.”
 
 The ADD-CKD study will recruit 460 primary care practitioner providers.  Each provider will recruit 21 type 2 diabetes patients, for a total of 9,660 patients. The study, to be administered by primary care physicians and primary care nurse practitioners will use a primary care provider survey, a patient physical exam and medical history, lab testing, including blood and urine and patient quality of life questionnaires. Enrollment begins in June 2011.

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